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12 results for Railroads--North Carolina--History
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Record #:
14500
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Abstract:
There were many interesting events in connection with the early development of railroads in North Carolina; also quite a lot of opposition on the part of certain people.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 5, June 1945, p1, 16-17, f
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Record #:
24455
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This article presents the host of museums that preserve North Carolina’s railroading heritage, which began in 1833. The museums include the Wilmington Railroad Museum, the North Carolina Transportation Museum, the National Railroad Museum, the North Carolina Railroad Museum and the New Hope Valley Railway, the Old Fort Depot, and the Piedmont North Carolina Railroad Museum.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 58 Issue 12, May 1991, p32-36, il
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Record #:
24453
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This article presents the history of the North Carolina Railroad Company, which owns the tracks upon which the Carolinian travels. The tracks were built in the decade before the Civil War in order to promote and facilitate economic development in the Piedmont.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 58 Issue 12, May 1991, p18-20, por
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Record #:
24454
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This article presents passenger routes in North Carolina, such as Tweetsie Railroad, that serve as tourist attractions and relics of North Carolina’s past.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 58 Issue 12, May 1991, p24-29, il
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Record #:
24509
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This article discusses the history and economic importance of narrow gauge railroads in North Carolina. Narrow gauge railroads were less costly to build than standard railroads and made use of smaller, lighter steam engines. These types of railroads were perfect for difficult or mountainous terrain.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 11, April 1978, p14-16, il
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Record #:
24532
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One section of the historic East Tennessee and Western North Carolina Railroad is being saved and put to recreational use by taking tourists on rides through some of the most dramatic and beautiful sections of the track.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 6, November 1977, p18-20, il
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Record #:
22378
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Abstract:
The 1912 dedication of a bust of Governor Morehead in the Hall of the House of Representatives marked the occasion for this review of the contributions of the governor. As both governor and later promoter of the North Carolina Railroad, Morehead greatly improved transportation and commerce within the state. His far-reaching public programs still affect us today.
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Record #:
4378
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Chartered in 1849 and completed in 1856, the North Carolina Railroad was one of the longest lines of its day. Its 233 miles connected Western counties to the state's seaports and brought population and economic growth to the Piedmont. In 1895, the state, the line's main stockholder, leased the railroad to the Southern Railway for ninety-nine years. The state is considering what to do with the railroad when the lease expires in 1994.
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Record #:
29774
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Built in the 1880s to expedite shipping of minerals and timber, the railroads in western North Carolina now serve as tourist attractions. Tweetsie Railroad attracts visitors and employs more than 300 local residents, while the Great Smoky Mountain Railway runs more than 200,000 passengers on excursion runs every year.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 9, Sept 2008, p50-51, por
Record #:
31423
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Abstract:
Spencer Shops State Historic Site, near Salisbury, is the former location of the largest Southern railway facility between Washington and Atlanta. The new exhibit, “People, Places and Times,” covers transportation history in North Carolina, from a prehistoric Indian canoe to a modern day airplane. This article discusses the history of the Southern Railway, and some of the features in the museum exhibit.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 15 Issue 10, Oct 1983, p18-19, por Periodical Website
Record #:
36281
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Abstract:
An industry was given an opportunity to recoup a job loss of 90,000 in the redevelopment of North Carolina’s railroad system. Created in 1849 and spanning 317 miles, the development promises to spur growth for two major industries, railroads and manufacturing.
Record #:
38213
Author(s):
Abstract:
Senate president Calvin Graves’ conclusion, that North Carolina needed railroads, brought a better connection between the state’s crop producing west and machinery producing east. Results were the founding of cities such as Burlington and creation of conduits for ports such Wilmington’s. The irony behind this beginning is Grave’s concluded political career in his home county and relative anonymity today. Currently, only a highway marker in Yanceyville recognizes his role in the growth of North Carolina’s manufacturing industries’ muscle.