NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


10 results for Railroads--North Carolina
Currently viewing results 1 - 10
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
10476
Abstract:
Although passenger travel has declined on railroads, freight tonnage has increased, rising from 70.5 million tons in 1960 to 96.7 tons in 1965. Today twenty-seven railroads operate in the state on 4,408 miles of track. Only seven of North Carolina's one hundred counties have no railroad track mileage now in use.
Source:
Record #:
23213
Author(s):
Abstract:
Building a new light rail route from UNC to Alston Ave and a corresponding train yard would require many acres and displace businesses and residents alike.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 9, March 2015, p8, map Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
24177
Author(s):
Abstract:
Light rail in Charlotte created a construction boom as businesses cropped up along the rail route. Light rail may be the answer for North Carolinas bustling cities as it becomes more expensive to buy gas and park in town.
Record #:
24205
Abstract:
Plans to bolster rail service throughout Eastern North Carolina might make two ports more attractive to shipping lines, imports, and exports. This worries some farmers that the rail line will become slower and non-reliable when delivering much needed feed supplies.
Full Text:
Record #:
24453
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article presents the history of the North Carolina Railroad Company, which owns the tracks upon which the Carolinian travels. The tracks were built in the decade before the Civil War in order to promote and facilitate economic development in the Piedmont.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 58 Issue 12, May 1991, p18-20, por
Full Text:
Record #:
30301
Author(s):
Abstract:
An important factor in the growth of industry throughout North Carolina has been the nearly 5000 miles of railroad, main lines and branch systems. Railroad facilities help make North Carolina even more centrally located along the eastern seaboard for the transportation of raw materials and finished products.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 11 Issue 6, November 1953, p69-70, 118, 120, por, map
Record #:
30540
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is known for its pioneering efforts in building railroads, seaports, and airlines. Between 1800 and 1837, North Carolina sponsored and owned the longest span of railroad in the world; this developed into the statewide system known today, with larger systems extending into other regions of the United States for both passenger and freight transport. Additionally, the state's ports are handling the ever-increasing import and export tonnage of industrial products along the eastern seaboard. Further, air transport in North Carolina is now fed by six lines, with large centers in several regions of the state.
Record #:
30771
Author(s):
Abstract:
Southern Railway purchased the outstanding stock of the Atlantic and East Carolina Railway Company. The 96 mile railway extends from a connection with the Southern at Goldsboro, North Carolina to the Atlantic Ocean port at Morehead City. After four years of negotiation, the A&EC will continue to be operated as a separate short line railroad.
Record #:
38213
Author(s):
Abstract:
Senate president Calvin Graves’ conclusion, that North Carolina needed railroads, brought a better connection between the state’s crop producing west and machinery producing east. Results were the founding of cities such as Burlington and creation of conduits for ports such Wilmington’s. The irony behind this beginning is Grave’s concluded political career in his home county and relative anonymity today. Currently, only a highway marker in Yanceyville recognizes his role in the growth of North Carolina’s manufacturing industries’ muscle.
Record #:
40078
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tenth Street and Dickinson Avenue’s railroad track offers no apparent evidence of its longstanding connection and importance to East Carolina University. However, it, part of the Atlantic Coastline Railroad, served as a major transportation hub when ECU was East Carolina College. In fact, the presence of this railroad company was a reason for Greenville becoming the site for what began as East Carolina Teacher’s Training School.