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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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15 results for Agriculture--North Carolina
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Record #:
13587
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Farmers are hard at work everywhere and prospects are unusually good for a fine agricultural year throughout the entire section of the state.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 4, June 1951, p3-5, 17, map, f
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Record #:
16918
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The farmland of the eastern United States has changed greatly in its configuration, distribution, usage, and ownership since the 1960s. Using a 1960 baseline, the farmland and farms of North Carolina are examined to ascertain the form, processes, locations, and changes in the state's agricultural geography.
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North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 8 Issue , 2000, p1-13, map, bibl
Record #:
17759
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E. B. Harris is invaluable when it comes to the sale of agricultural products in northeastern North Carolina. When it comes to the auctioning of cows, farm equipment, or corn in Warren County, no one knows it or does it better.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 5, Oct 2012, p120-126, 128, 130, 132, 134, 136, 138, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
17760
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North Carolina has a varied foundation of soils to provide a varied foundation for agricultural practices in the state.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 5, Oct 2012, p140-142, 144-152, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
27323
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To improve the sustainability of its farming methods, residents of Asheville are exploring the uses of aquaponics. The technique combines aquaculture which is fish farming and hydroponics which is growing plants in water. Aquaponics is a method which uses nutrient-rich water provided by fish and their waste to help grow plants which then recycle the clean water back to the fish. Aquaponics uses 90 percent less water than traditional soil farming and prevents the damaging of soil and waterways.
Record #:
28488
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This photoessay provides photographs and stories about farms which grow strawberries in North Carolina. Patterson Farm in China Grove, NC, Ingram Farm in High Point, NC, The Berry Patch in Ellerbe, NC, Cottle Farms in Faison, NC, Vollmer Farm in Bunn, NC, Lewis Nursery and Farms in Rocky Point, and Holden Brothers Farm Market in Shallotte, NC are all photographed and described.
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Record #:
28671
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North Carolina’s farmers markets are growing, to the benefit of local communities. North Carolina has the 10th most farmers’ markets per state in the country with over 250 local markets. The markets often fill a basic need for fresh produce, provide a connection to safer, healthier, locally sourced food, and have encouraged the growth of small farms. The markets also provide the benefit of increasing a sense of community in a town.
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Record #:
29050
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Reorganization of the United States Department of Agriculture may have significant impacts to North Carolina farms and rural communities. The proposal combines USDA divisions in charge of farm subsidies and land stewardship, areas in which the department interacts directly with farmers. Reorganization would also eliminate the undersecretary for rural development, which worries small farm advocates.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 20, May 2017, p15-16, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34444
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Sa North Carolina moves closer to becoming a leader in the burgeoning craft beer industry, proponents seek better opportunities for local support in the manufacturing process. A principal ingredient, hops is grown almost exclusively in the Pacific Northwest. While growing conditions in much of North Carolina are not ideal for the production of hops, current research at NC State has led to the development of a new specimen of hops suited to Western North Carolina’s climate. Art Robertson, owner of Running Turtle Hops Farm in Liberty, NC notes the impact of locally grown hops as for quality and economic impact realized.
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Record #:
30189
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North Carolina agriculture contributes millions of dollars to the state’s economy, and cultivates diverse commodities and businesses. The industry is also constantly changing with new technology, farm programs and policies. This article explores changes underway for farmers, processors, scientists and consumers.
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Record #:
30883
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Although industrial and manufacturing expansion have been heralded as North Carolina's economic driver, agriculture will continue to be one of the most important industries and businesses for the state. For example, recent industrial expansions have related to and been dependent on agriculture, such as investments in dairy plants, meat packing payroll, increased mixed feed volume, petroleum purchases, and freight revenue. North Carolina farmers sold three quarters of a billion dollars in crops and livestock, led all other states in value of farm commodities and products, and led in retail and processing. North Carolina also leads in training and agricultural research.
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Record #:
30926
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A billion dollar part of North Carolina's economy took a big step this summer. Agriculture in the state began an 8-point program to keep pace with rapid changes and developments in the field. The 10 year effort will seek to produce as much cotton, tobacco, and peanuts as are profitable, while expanding hog, beef, egg, fruit and vegetables; fit production to market demands and outlets; increase size of business; specialize production on individual farms; develop and apply more technology in production and marketing; improve managerial abilities; improve marketing and processing; promote sound public agricultural policy.
Record #:
31659
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United States Senator Sam Ervin discusses the importance of North Carolina agriculture and identifies developments that threaten it. Ervin also highlights important business and trade elements that provide services to sustain farm operations, and the state’s flue cured tobacco market.
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Record #:
33195
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The 1985 crop season in North Carolina began extremely dry. Small grains suffered the most early in the season, and continued to deteriorate from drought. The dryness allowed progress in land preparation and early planting of Irish potatoes, cabbage and cool season garden crops.
Record #:
33362
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According to the North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service, the drought affecting the Piedmont and Mountain regions of the state came at one of the worst times possible for agriculture. As early crops in July struggled to survive and bear, later plantings of soybeans and sorghum were having trouble germinating. The drought’s impacts are also affecting cattle and poultry producers.