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12 results for Education, Higher--North Carolina
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Record #:
13541
Author(s):
Abstract:
Last September more than 2,000,000 young men and women enrolled in colleges and universities throughout America. Approximately 2 per cent of these, or 40,000 students, are attending one of North Carolina's fifty-seven schools of higher education.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 46, Apr 1954, p3-4, 12-14, f
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Record #:
13912
Abstract:
Pfeiffer Junior College is considered one of North Carolina's most beautiful college campuses, but there is more at Misenheimer than meets the eye.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 18 Issue 9, July 1950, p8-9, 20, f
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Record #:
14590
Author(s):
Abstract:
Madison details how some of North Carolina's institutions of higher education obtained their start, and the impetus that was given to a general system of education in the State.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 37, Feb 1946, p11, 18
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Record #:
17817
Abstract:
A report by the Commission on Higher Education made several recommendations to the 1955 North Carolina General Assembly. Among them was the establishment of a North Carolina State Board of Higher Education, with the duty of coordinating the state's system of higher education and preparing for increases in enrollments.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 21 Issue 6, Mar 1955, p11, Inside back cover
Record #:
24316
Author(s):
Abstract:
Distance learning is becoming more popular at the collegiate level. Various community colleges offer distance learning and other video-taught classes.
Record #:
25362
Author(s):
Abstract:
Over the course of an interview, Professor James LeRoy Smith discusses ethics and how he prepares his students for real life and the ethical decisions they will face.
Record #:
27492
Author(s):
Abstract:
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is facing its third straight year of budget cuts and the effects are being felt. Many feel the quality of the university is decreasing. Others believe this negative point of view is a matter of perception. Faculty received a raise and is the fifth highest paid faculty in the South. Still, the pay is behind other nation’s universities and the cuts are affecting money for materials, library services, and graduate student stipends.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 8 Issue 37, September 12-18 1990, p8-11 Periodical Website
Record #:
27759
Author(s):
Abstract:
Governor Pat McCrory’s education ideas are explored. The governor has indicated that the universities in North Carolina need reforming and that money should be redistributed to programs that can prove their graduates get jobs. McCrory’s comments and position on education reform have many concerned and may indicate that the governor is not as moderate has he has led many to believe.
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Record #:
31089
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1963 North Carolina General Assembly and state Advisory Budget Commission will face questions of policy and appropriations for public higher education operations in the coming session. With higher enrollment, proposals have been made for the creation of three additional senior colleges to be state supported and fifteen comprehensive community colleges. It is also suggested that the state and federal levels pay 65 percent while the local governments pay 15 and the student fees 20 percent.
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Record #:
31098
Author(s):
Abstract:
The faculty-student ratio is a matter of top priority and interest to college administrators. In North Carolina, with over 2500 faculty and over 33000 students enrolled, there are only 13 students per faculty member. This is below the ratio in other states, providing North Carolina students with greater one-on-one interactions.
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Record #:
31097
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's resident supply of college graduates, increasing over 45% from 1940 to 1950 and 40% from 1950 to 1960. Unfortunately, only 40% of graduates are retained in the state, and the out-migration of college graduates to other states is consistently high.
Record #:
31105
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1960, North Carolina ranked 12th in population among the states via the Federal census. In terms of expenditures for higher education, it ranked seventh for public schools and thirteenth for private colleges. The state's combined rank was 10th, with current expense costs over $103 million.