NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


35 results for Seay, Majel Ivey
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 3
Next
Record #:
11528
Author(s):
Abstract:
Seay describes how Biltmore Industries grew from a small business to the largest hand weaving industry in the world.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 1 Issue 48, Apr 1934, p7, il
Full Text:
Record #:
11606
Author(s):
Abstract:
Seay discusses the Carolina Aluminum Company which is located at Badin in Stanly County.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 1, June 1934, p21, il
Full Text:
Record #:
11624
Author(s):
Abstract:
Calvary Episcopal Church, located at Fletcher, between Asheville and Hendersonville, commemorates the lives of noted artists, writers, musicians, and benefactors of the South through the erection of bronze markers on granite boulders. To date twenty-five markers have been erected, and like England's Westminster Abbey, the boulders are in rows, like the \"Poet's Corner\" and \"Statesmen's Corner.\"
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 4, June 1934, p11, 22, il
Full Text:
Record #:
11622
Author(s):
Abstract:
William Gaston is one of North Carolina's greatest citizens. Lawyer, legislator, congressman, and judge, he wrote the words for \"The Old North State\", which, since 1927, has been North Carolina's official state song.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 3, June 1934, p21
Full Text:
Record #:
11635
Author(s):
Abstract:
Seay discusses the influence Frederick Koch had on the dramatic arts in North Carolina in the early part of the 20th-century. While a professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Koch founded the Carolina Playmakers, one of the most influential repertoire groups of its time.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 6, July 1934, p9, por
Full Text:
Record #:
11746
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ivey describes the aims and purposes of Penderlea, a planned farm community being built in Pender County to improve poor living conditions of people brought on by the Depression. The first one hundred families will be in residence within the next three months.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 11, Aug 1934, p2
Full Text:
Record #:
11757
Author(s):
Abstract:
Blakely, a naval officer and hero of the War of 1812, was a native of Ireland. At the age of two, his parents brought him to Wilmington. He attended the University of North Carolina then sought a career in the U.S. Navy. He became midshipmen in 1800 and later commanded the WASP during the war. Blakely, his crew and ship were last seen October 19, 1814. Nothing is known of them from that date.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 14, Sept 1934, p3, por
Full Text:
Record #:
11753
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has five institutions located around the state which are endeavoring to make law-abiding men and women out of wayward boys and girls. Ivey discusses what each institution seeks to accomplish.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 13, Aug 1934, p8, 22
Full Text:
Record #:
12585
Author(s):
Abstract:
Born in Connecticut in 1777, Lorenzo Dow, moved to North Carolina to become a preacher. Scheduling appointments statewide as well as performing at various public locations, Dow was able to amass crowds of up to 1,500 people and issue sermons lasting for some four and one half hours. Dow was known for his ability to recover lost or stolen items, his powerful influence in the religious life of North Carolina, as well as his role as an eccentric pioneer Methodist evangelist.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 30 Issue 7, Sept 1962, p8, por
Full Text:
Record #:
14071
Author(s):
Abstract:
The story of Frances Silver is retold along with a reprint of a ballad composed by Silver while in jail for murder. Silver lived near Burke with her husband and child, and while her husband lay sleeping on the floor, she used an ax to murder him, burning his body to hide the evidence. Silver was convicted and hanged on July 12, 1833.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 1, June 1948, p36-37
Full Text:
Record #:
14394
Author(s):
Abstract:
Anna McNeill, the subject of James McNeill Whistler's painting, Whistler's Mother, was born in North Carolina. Though, McNeill's early life in North Carolina is largely lost to history, the author draws conclusions about the woman through the eyes of her son who left behind diaries, poetry, and portraits.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 50, May 1949, p3, 22, il
Full Text:
Record #:
14500
Author(s):
Abstract:
There were many interesting events in connection with the early development of railroads in North Carolina; also quite a lot of opposition on the part of certain people.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 5, June 1945, p1, 16-17, f
Full Text:
Record #:
14525
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the days when dueling was in flower, there were many challenges issued and accepted in North Carolina, like the three presented here.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 14, Sept 1945, p3, 20
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
14585
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although not generally known, it was Colonel Samuel Davison who blazed the trail for the first permanent settlement across the Blue Ridge, where he later met a tragic fate.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 35, Jan 1946, p11
Full Text:
Record #:
14591
Author(s):
Abstract:
William Gaston was one of North Carolina's truly great citizens, but thousands sing the state song without knowing that he was the author.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 38, Feb 1946, p5
Full Text: