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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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12 results for Antiques
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Record #:
23534
Author(s):
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Joy Shivar is an antiques dealer who reconnects families with lost heirlooms.
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Record #:
23640
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Blue Barnhouse makes use of antique letter presses from the early 1900s to create and sell cards, posters, and other printed media.
Record #:
24092
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The Estes-Winn Antique Car Museum is housed in a building that used to be used for the production of fabric. Now, Asheville locals can visit the Museum to examine restored cars from early-to-late 20th century.
Record #:
25100
Abstract:
Three antique shops in North Carolina have a number of collectors’ items that one may not find in larger antique stores. This article describes the Antique Tobacco Barn in Asheville, SuzAnna’s Antiques in Raleigh, and Seaport Antiques in Morehead City, highlighting the types of antiques found in each.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 11, April 2016, p108-110, 112-115, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
30339
Author(s):
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The Bank of America building in downtown Charlotte is an extraordinary monument to modern banking, and also houses a collection of artifacts on the sixtieth floor. The artifacts are antique mechanical toy penny banks made of cast-iron.
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Carolina Banker (HG 2153 N8 C66), Vol. 91 Issue 1, Spring 2012, p23-24, il
Record #:
31697
Abstract:
The personal antique museum of Laurinburg’s Lindo and Mary Harvell is full of treasures from days gone by, each with a story to tell. The couple uses Lindo’s hobby of restoring antiques to fill the museum since none of his projects are for sale.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 64 Issue 1, Jun 1996, p32-33, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
36991
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The word keepsake may bring up images of items fragile and collectible: not for everyday use. In Castle’s case, the heirloom that has lasted the test of time weighs six pounds. The pictured heirloom, which has inspired a collection of kitchen tools, has a value beyond measure.
Record #:
36182
Abstract:
The author gives the accepted definition of an antique as an artifact, made with human hands that is more than 100 years old. He elaborates on provenance, high-style vs. folk art, style, joinery and skill of the craftsman.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 16 Issue No. 3, , p2-6, il
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Record #:
36288
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A profile of Waxhaw revealed the town, potentially dwarfed by a nearby metropolis, has ways to be noticed. The town incorporated in 1889 and once known as an antique mecca was experiencing growth in areas such as transportation, dining, housing, and the arts.
Record #:
36335
Abstract:
The author gives the accepted definition of an antique as an artifact, made with human hands that is more than 100 years old. He elaborates on provenance, high-style vs. folk art, style, joinery and skill of the craftsman.
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Record #:
38293
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How he fulfills the roles of preservationist and collector: amassing items such as 18th-century Kentucky longrifles, 19th-century salt-glaze pottery, furniture from the 18th century; amassing stories of the people who made these items. In the process, he saves the items and their history, almost palpable beneath their materials, not for just his own pleasure or fulfillment. The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts and individuals who share his twin passions may have such item available for generations to come.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 11, Apr 2011, p128-130, 132, 134-135 Periodical Website
Record #:
38279
Author(s):
Abstract:
Brady C. Jefcoat’s Museum of Americana has items representing American culture from the distant and more recent past. Opened in 1997, it contains the half of Jefcoat’s collection that was not auctioned off and is especially known for its 264 vintage record players and the country's largest collection of butter churns and irons. Despite the Smithsonian being receptive to his request to donate his immense collection, he chose Murfreesboro because the town was willing to display the entirety of his 13,000 treasures.
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