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9 results for Raleigh, Sir Walter, 1552-1618
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Record #:
13807
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Abstract:
The state celebrates the 400th anniversary of the birth of Sir Walter Raleigh.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 49, May 1952, p6-7, f
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Record #:
13914
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Sir Walter Raleigh probably would be called a capitalist today, but the history of North Carolina would be far different if it hadn't been for this enterprising Englishman.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 18 Issue 11, Aug 1950, p6, por
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Record #:
19838
Abstract:
This article looks at the involvement of 255 Southern men (11 from or associated with North Carolina) in the English legal intellectual institution known as the Inns of Court, and its associated groups, The Inner Temple, The Middle Temple, Gray's Inn and Lincoln's Inn. The article provides background information for each associated group, and then lists the American Southern men admitted to the institution by state and including their year of admission and the group to which they belonged. The North Carolina inductees mentioned are William Brimage, Gabriel Cathcart, Thomas Child, Sir Richard Everard, Enoch Hall, Henry Eustace McCulloh, Thomas McGuire, Josiah Martin, Sir Walter Raleigh, Benjamin Smith, and Alexander White. Some biographical information on certain members from Southern states follows this list.
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Record #:
24505
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The author discusses the life and accomplishments of Sir Walter Raleigh (1552-1618) and his connection to North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 10, March 1978, p20-22, il
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Record #:
24651
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The author highlights the Roanoke explorations, Sir Walter Raleigh (1552-1618), and the first colonists on Roanoke Island, with special attention paid to a relatively unknown member of the exploration party, Edward Gorges, who sailed to the Island in 1585 with Sir Richard Granville.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 24, May 1959, p7-8, por
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Record #:
22441
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In addition to his encouragement of exploration, Sir Walter Raleigh supported the literature of his age as both a poet and a patron of literature. Several of his poems were addressed to Queen Elizabeth.
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Record #:
31310
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Beginning in early March, the “Raleigh and Roanoke” exhibition will be at the North Carolina Museum of History in Raleigh to commemorate the Roanoke Voyages of 1584-1597. The voyages, sponsored by Sir Walter Raleigh, brought the first English settlers of America to what are now the Outer Banks of North Carolina. The exhibit showcases 157 artifacts and documents from seventeen different international depositories.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 17 Issue 2, Feb 1985, p24, il
Record #:
34446
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Abstract:
In the early 20th century, North Carolina historians and civil leaders were interested in promoting a white Anglo heritage commemorating the State’s 1587 “founding.” This interest, coinciding with the U.S. entrance into the First World War, aimed to strengthen North Carolinians’ awareness of English heritage and to justify white supremacy. Central to the public promotion of this heritage was a civic pageant, written by Frederick Koch and performed in 1920, which used Sir Walter Raleigh as a model of democracy, set in opposition to modern “threats” of anarchy and communism.
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Record #:
37306
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The Historic Bath Foundation opened an exhibit hall in a renovated section of the town’s old high school building. Bringing history to life were exhibits such as Blackbeard, featuring an historic interpreter for the pirate who had a house in Bath. Putting history on display were artifacts, such as Theodore DeBry illustrations from 1590; historic maps; and antique firearms. Preserving history was extended to maintaining much of the original architectural structure of the 1920s building while adding a library, gallery, gift shop, and town offices.