NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


15 results for Roanoke Island--History
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
4343
Abstract:
No one knows why the Roanoke Island colonists mysteriously disappeared. A number of theories abound as to the fate of the Lost Colony, including destruction from a hurricane; drought in the early stages of the colony as evidenced by a study of tree rings; massacre by hostile Native Americans; and attack from the Spanish who were at war with England.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 67 Issue 6, Nov 1999, p122-124, 126-128, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
6385
Author(s):
Abstract:
Between 1862 and 1867, an experimental, planned community for freed slaves existed on Roanoke Island. It was under the direction of Union soldiers. Around 3,000 Afro-Americans lived there by the end of 1863. The colony had its own schools, churches, craft businesses, a sawmill, and around 600 houses and gardens.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 36 Issue 2, Feb 2004, p14-15, il
Record #:
10668
Author(s):
Abstract:
What happened to the English settlers on Roanoke Island in the late 16th-century is one of the nation's greatest mysteries. The 150 colonists--men, women, and children--disappeared without a trace. Centuries later the disappearance remains unsolved.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 36 Issue 2, June 1968, p10-12, 60, il
Full Text:
Record #:
13276
Author(s):
Abstract:
On Roanoke Island once strode the greatest sea captains of England's finest era. In honor of the colonists who traveled down to North Carolina from Jamestown to colonize the Albemarle, The North Carolina Garden Club will build an Elizabethan Garden in the primitive soil of Roanoke Island.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 7, July 1953, p17-18, f
Full Text:
Record #:
17253
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many theories have been put forth which try to explain the disappearance of Sir Walter Raleigh's colonists on Roanoke Island. McCall presents another one slightly different from the others.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 7 Issue 3, June 1939, p61-62, il
Full Text:
Record #:
24651
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author highlights the Roanoke explorations, Sir Walter Raleigh (1552-1618), and the first colonists on Roanoke Island, with special attention paid to a relatively unknown member of the exploration party, Edward Gorges, who sailed to the Island in 1585 with Sir Richard Granville.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 24, May 1959, p7-8, por
Full Text:
Record #:
22430
Abstract:
The fate of the \"lost\" English colony on Roanoke Island remains a mystery. John White's diary provides evidence of the earliest attempt to locate the missing colonists.
Full Text:
Record #:
35518
Author(s):
Abstract:
The disappearing act was “The Lost Colony,” the touted first outdoor play about the colony of English settlers who settled in Roanoke in 1588 and disappeared in 1590, with the most famous being the first born on American soil, Virginia Dare. As the author suggested, the virtue of Paul Green’s play was leaving audience members deciding how to solve the mystery behind the disappearance for themselves.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 2 Issue 2, June/July 1974, p14, 31
Record #:
37944
Author(s):
Abstract:
By 1862, North Carolina was divided by more than region. In the Piedmont and mountains, secessionists had control of the government. In the Coastal Plain, there was vast Union troop occupation, from major battle losses in Washington, New Bern, Morehead City, Wilmington, Beaufort. All over the state, chaos was also the victor because of conditions such as diphtheria outbreaks; guerrilla forces called “buffaloes”; Confederate forces that were intermittently organized; military generals seizing governmental control in the void of political leadership.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 12, May 2014, p214-216, 218-222, 224 Periodical Website
Record #:
38128
Abstract:
The mystery around the Chowan River was two-fold: Lost Colonists of Roanoke Island; Dorothie, whose remains are believed discovered in Bennett’s Creek. Both parts of the mystery are examined in Don Upchurch’s In Pursuit of Dorothie, the Lost Colony Ship. Part investigation, part speculation, it explores a three-fold explanation for the two-fold mystery. The Dorothie transported the Colonists out of Roanoke, which means they survived beyond 1590, thus offering Croatan a meaning not related to death, but a new life.
Record #:
38258
Author(s):
Abstract:
Described by the author and displayed in photographs by Patrick Schneider is a Waterside Theatre performance of Paul Green’s The Lost Colony. Words and pictures collaboratively explain the enduring mystique of his play and the Roanoke Island colonists’ story.
Source:
Record #:
38920
Author(s):
Abstract:
William Reed, appears as early as 1711 as an assemblyman signing a letter denouncing Cary’s Rebellion and in 1712, signing a letter petitioning help from the Governor of Virginia against the Tuscarora. In 1712, Reed was a member of the Virginia –North Carolina Boundary Line Commission. In 1715, Reed was named as vestryman for the Currituck Precinct parish. He became Proprietor’s deputy, a member of the Council and was acting Governor of North Carolina from 1722 to 1724. In 1723, he named himself and others as town commissioners to enlarge the town of Carteret, which was recently incorporated on the northeastern side of Roanoke Island. Reed died at his home in Pasquotank County.
Record #:
40904
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Lost Colony Center for Science and Research’s director supports a less popular theory for the Roanoke Colony’s fate. Fred Willard doesn't support the conventional theories: they succumbed to starvation or became massacre victims. His quest for truth has also led to this possibility: the presence of colonists’ surnames in Eastern North Carolina families claiming a Native American heritage suggests they moved inland and integrated.
Source:
Greenville: Life in the East (NoCar F264 G8 G743), Vol. Issue , Summer 2016, p12-14, 46
Record #:
41241
Author(s):
Abstract:
The First Colony Foundation’s efforts have yielded the recognition of its lesser known figures. Stafford’s contributions to European exploration included helping to lead the 1585 expedition and establish the Roanoke colony. Related to his identity is the author’s examination of several Stafford families possibly including him. Speculations of Stafford’s importance in permanent European settlements, had his life not been cut short, include involvement in Jamestown.