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18 results for The Lost Colony (Play)
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Record #:
349
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The history of outdoor dramas in North Carolina begins with \"The Lost Colony\" in 1937 and includes the productions of \"Unto These Hills,\" a Cherokee drama, and \"From This Day Forward,\" a drama depicting the Waldensians, a group of French- Italian Protestants who immigrated to America in 1893.
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NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 5 Issue 4, Feb 1983, p15-21, il, por, f
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Record #:
12635
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The eternal mystery of Sir Walter Raleigh's Lost Colonists is still North Carolina's No. 1 Story. First published in \"American Heritage,\" Powell's article tells the story of North Carolina from Sir Walter Raleigh's 1584 land patent, to the settling on Roanoke Island, and finally the return of Lane and Grenville to the colony only to find it abandoned.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 5, Aug 1958, p9-10, por
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Record #:
15470
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Down at Manteo, things are already in place in anticipation of the entertainment of at least 50,000 visitors this summer for the 350th anniversary celebration of the landing of Sir Walter Raleigh's first English colonists. The celebration will be staged in August to welcome President Roosevelt as well.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 4 Issue 49, May 1937, p1, 21, f
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Record #:
17316
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No one knows the exact cost of the reconstruction of the Waterside Theatre at Fort Raleigh due to the intangibles attached to attached to the Lost Colony production. The material objects were destroyed--set, scenery, props--but not even the fire could touch the intangibles, and so the Waterside Theatre was rebuilt and the Lost Colony resumed its tenth anniversary season.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 13 Issue 6, Oct 1947, p10, 16
Record #:
20607
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The production of the Lost Colony began at Manteo in 1937 and suspended in 1941 when the United States entered the war. With gasoline, tire, and outdoor lighting restrictions now lifted, people in Dare County are looking forward to starting up the famous pageant again next summer. It will be produced on a more elaborate scale than ever before.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 29, Dec 1945, p6-7, 19-20, il
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Record #:
21794
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This article discusses the August 1937 visit of President Franklin D. Roosevelt to Roanoke Island, North Carolina. While there to view the work of the Works Progress Administration and the Civilian Conservation Corp, Roosevelt also stopped to see a production of 'The Lost Colony.'
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Record #:
23150
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Sir Ralph Lane led the second failed expedition to Roanoke Island in 1585. Lane's detailed descriptions of Roanoke Island and his story became part of Paul Green's outdoor drama, The Lost Colony. Today, a mannequin of his likeness is featured at the Northampton County Welcome Center and is dressed in a Lost Colony costume designed by renowned costume designer William Ivey Long.
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Record #:
16138
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The riddle in this article refers to the Lost Colony, a mystery historians and experts have been unable to find a conclusive answer. Seven hypotheses are presented in this article in an attempt to explain what happened to those early English settlers who disappeared.
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Record #:
29151
Abstract:
Each year dozens of parents bring their young babies to audition to play the most important non-speaking role in the Lost Colony: the first English child born in America, Virginia Dare.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 4, September 2017, p124-126, 128-129, por Periodical Website
Record #:
32214
Author(s):
Abstract:
Three historical outdoor dramas are presented in North Carolina every summer. The oldest of North Carolina’s outdoor dramas is “The Lost Colony,” which portrays the events leading to the colony’s disappearance. The drama “Horn in the West” tells the story of Daniel Boone, and “Unto These Hills” portrays the struggle of the Cherokee Indians to live in peace in their own native land.
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Record #:
32606
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Since 1937, Roanoke Island has been home to “The Lost Colony,” the late Paul Green’s outdoor drama about Sir Walter Raleigh’s abortive efforts to establish a permanent English colony in America. Green called the play a “symphonic drama” and wrote fifteen others, six of which are still produced annually. The Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright died May 4 at age 87.
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Record #:
34696
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In the 1930’s, playwright Paul Green attempted to create a play regarding the Lost Colony of Roanoke in North Carolina. The story known by most people does not include the ending, however, and even today, there is debate about what happened to the colonists. Paul Green changed his endings several times, the last of which in 1980’s left on a more hopeful note. This article goes into detail about what prompted each of these changes and how they were interpreted by the audiences.
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North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. 27 Issue , 2018, p52-71, il, por, f Periodical Website
Record #:
34935
Abstract:
The Lost Colony play has been a staple for the Manteo community for 80 years and for a few lucky families, it gets to be even more a part of their lives. The play has incorporated using real babies for the part of Virginia Dare, the first European child to be born in the United States.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 4, September 2017, p124-129, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
35525
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Ragan examined an artistic expression array manifested on canvases literal and figurative. It was revealed in Edenton and Tryon Palace’s restorations. The State Library’s film service expansion and ECU’s summer drama program’s production of “The Lost Colony” displayed it. Poetry and prose were showcased in Atlantic Christian’s Crucible and ECU’s Poet-in-Residence program.
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New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1973, p20-21, 40-43
Record #:
35698
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Abstract:
NC’s plays about the Lost Colony of Roanoke, Blackbeard, Tom Dooley, Daniel Boone, and Andrew Jackson may come as no surprise. This state was a home for the famous pirate and Elizabethan era English settlers, the subject of the popular song, battle site for this Revolutionary War freedom fighter, and settlement that included Jackson’s parents. Plays about NC’s perhaps lesser known ways of involvement in the Revolutionary War included Fight for Freedom, about the first Declaration of Independence document; The Liberty Cart, about the Battle of Moore’s Creek. As for contributions from religious groups, there was Sound of Peace, about a Quaker settlement in Snow Camp. From this Day Forward traced the life of the Walden family, whose descendants and bakeries still exist in Valdese.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p18-21