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17 results for Saunders, Keith
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Record #:
14592
Author(s):
Abstract:
Helicopters, seaplanes, radar, and other technological devices will play important roles in lifesaving work from now on.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 40, Feb 1946, p12-13, f
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Record #:
14891
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During World War II, North Carolina residents moved to the Portsmouth-Norfolk-Newport News area in Virginia to find jobs in the shipbuilding industry. Wartime efforts created a great need for laborers and demand raised average wages from $45 to $125 a week. Shipbuilding, ship repair, and other defense industries required the greatest number of workers. Higher salaries for office work also tempted women away from clerical work in rural North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 16, Sept 1943, p1, 22
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Record #:
15191
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By 1704 a settlement near Edenton blossomed to 1,300 people, 900 of which were members of the Church of England but lacked a spiritual space and proper minister. The Church of England sent Charles Griffin to their community in lower Pasquotank County. While in Edenton, Griffin not only started a church but also is credited with the earliest school founded in 1705 at Symond's Creek.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 6 Issue 24, Nov 1938, p1, il
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Record #:
15193
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In the 1930s Elizabeth City trumped other favorite stopping places for sailing enthusiasts making trips along the eastern seaboard. Elizabeth City cashed in on the natural features which gave its yacht basin advantages including: no tide, clean water, plentiful docking and repair facilities, and the Pasquotank's warm water temperatures which prevented freezing. Its location halfway between New York and Florida also added a benefit for the yachtsmen looking to rest.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 6 Issue 25, Nov 1938, p9, 24, il
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Record #:
15190
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During the late 1930s work was undertaken to stop the erosion of the Outer Banks. Some feared that complete loss of the Outer Banks would inundate mainland North Carolina which prompted Congress to approve the North Carolina beach Erosion Control Project. WPA and CCC boys completed the work which entailed erecting sand fences and planting grasses to prevent beach erosion.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 6 Issue 23, Nov 1938, p9-10, 22
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Record #:
15189
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A moth boat was a small class of sailing boat that was small and cheap and able to maneuver in shallow waters. Captain Joel Van Sant built the first moth boat in 1929. Moth boats quickly gained popularity and Elizabeth City became headquarters for their construction.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 6 Issue 22, Oct 1938, p5, 28, il
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Record #:
15203
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Abstract:
Criminals who think North Carolina is a comparatively safe place in which to commit a crime better think again. North Carolina is one of the few states in the United States that has its own State Bureau of Investigation. The S.B.I has rendered assistance to sheriffs, police departments, and solicitors.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 7 Issue 8, July 1939, p1,18, 22, f
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Record #:
15212
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North Carolina leads the United States in the production of mica, and today it is an important economic asset to Avery, Mitchell, and Yancey Counties where the mineral is found. There are at present seven companies engaged in mining or grinding mica in western North Carolina, and in 1937, North Carolina produced 1,057,316 pounds of mica, valued at $700,000.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 7 Issue 10, Aug 1939, p6
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Record #:
15233
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Robert Potter was one of the most brilliant figures ever to stride across the political scene in North Carolina, but his political genius was overshadowed and largely nullified by an unsurpassing violence and vindictiveness that landed him in jail on one occasion, resulted in his expulsion from the House of Commons on another, and finally led to his assassination.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 7 Issue 25, Nov 1939, p5, 26
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Record #:
15260
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Abstract:
Paul Garrett visited eastern North Carolina to look at the prospects of expanding the amount of vineyards in the area. He proposed 10,000 acres for both scuppernong and mish grapes to supply his company that produced Virginia Dare wines. He believed that expanding the Mother Vineyard in Dare County would become a $1,000,000 industry for eastern Carolinians.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 6 Issue 33, Jan 1939, p3, 30, il
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Record #:
17169
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The schooner Carroll M. Deering ran aground on the Diamond Shoals off the North Carolina Coast in February 1921. When the Coast Guard arrived, the crew and captain were not on board. Many theories were put forth, but none of them could answer the mystery disappearance. Now Captain Charles O. Peele, who was a Chief Boatswain at the time and among the rescuers who boarded the schooner presents his own theory.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 6 Issue 39, Feb 1939, p29
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Record #:
17259
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Abstract:
North Carolina is one of the few states in the country to have its own statewide investigative department, the State Bureau of Investigation (S.B.I.). The Bureau was authorized by an act of the 1937 General Assembly, but it was not until March 1938 that funds became available to finance its operations. Governor Clyde Hoey appointed Frederick C. Handy the Bureau's director. Handy was an ex-FBI man who had charge of the FBI office covering North and South Carolina for seven years.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 7 Issue 8, July 1939, p1, 18, 22, por
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Record #:
20360
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Saunders provides a character sketch of the state's new senator, Clyde Hoey. He is a former Governor of the state and took the U.S. Senate seat of Robert Rice Reynolds, who had vacated it.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 36, Feb 1945, p5, 20
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Record #:
20607
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Abstract:
The production of the Lost Colony began at Manteo in 1937 and suspended in 1941 when the United States entered the war. With gasoline, tire, and outdoor lighting restrictions now lifted, people in Dare County are looking forward to starting up the famous pageant again next summer. It will be produced on a more elaborate scale than ever before.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 29, Dec 1945, p6-7, 19-20, il
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Record #:
32684
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Abstract:
Helicopters, seaplanes, radar, and other technological devices will play important roles in lifesaving work for the Coast Guard. With the technological advances in observation and communication nearly two thirds of the Coast Guard stations will soon be deactivated.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 39, Feb 1946, p12-13, il
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