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11 results for Moores Creek Bridge, Battle of, N.C., 1776
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Record #:
5944
Author(s):
Abstract:
Scott recounts the Battle of Moore's Creek Bridge, an early battle of the Revolutionary War, fought on February 26, 1776. The battlefield is about 20 miles northwest of Wilmington, near Currie.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 3 Issue 2, May/June 1975, p32-34, il
Record #:
9918
Author(s):
Abstract:
In an effort to drum up publicity for their yearly gourd festival, the Cary Gourd Club is focusing attention on the display of the Mary Slocumb gourd at the Museum of History in Raleigh. The story of the gourd, which was allegedly used by Mrs. Slocumb as she ministered to the wounded soldiers at the Battle of Moore's Creek Bridge during the Revolutionary War, has been recorded in John H. Wheeler's HISTORICAL SKETCHES OF NORTH CAROLINA and Mrs. Eddie W. Wilson's THE GOURD IN FOLK LITERATURE.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 40 Issue 6, Aug 1972, p16, il
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Record #:
12199
Abstract:
The Battle of Moores Creek Bridge, February 27, 1776, was a complete victory for the Patriots, contributing to the Revolutionary cause in the South, with the Colony remaining in the Patriot's possession until British invasion in 1780. Some elements among settlers had not been amalgamated by the general population in 1775, chief of these was a large number of Scottish Highlanders, largely from clans MacDonald (Isles) and McLeod. These clans settled in the central part of the Colony between 1765 and 1775.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 8, Sept 1958, p17, por
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Record #:
13384
Author(s):
Abstract:
One of the most historic spots in southeastern North Carolina is Moore's Creek National Military Park, located in the southern part of Pender County, a place visited by thousands every year. It was here in 1776 that the Tory Scotch Highlanders were defeated by the Whigs, the first victory gained on North Carolina soil by American armies in the Revolution.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 16, Sept 1953, p19, 21-22
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Record #:
14738
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Battle of Moore's Creek preceded the Declaration of Independence and is considered as marking a considerable victory for the Patriots in their efforts against the Tories.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 25, Nov 1944, p6-7, f
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Record #:
20498
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article looks at the factors contributing to the Battle of Moore's Creek Bridge including information on politics and the war leading up to the battle as well as details on maneuvers and strategies utilized in the battle itself. Some hand drawn battlefield maps are included.
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Record #:
24541
Author(s):
Abstract:
A Wilmington bottle enthusiast celebrates the centennial by creating hand-blown glass bottles in the shape and fashion of bottles of past centuries. The bottles are stamped to highlight past events in North Carolina, such as the battle of Moores Creek.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 43 Issue 9, February 1976, p26-27, il
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Record #:
22062
Author(s):
Abstract:
An account of the Revolutionary War battle at Moore's Creek Bridge on February 17, 1776, including details on war's origin. Reprints of letters written by Colonels James Moore and Donald McDonald are included among the battle details.
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Record #:
28642
Author(s):
Abstract:
Two versions of the Moore’s Creek Battle in 1776, which were published in Philadelphia and Baltimore, are presented. The articles which were published in 1817 and 1822 provide detailed accounts of the North Carolina battle, General James Moore and his army.
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Record #:
29193
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Battle at Moore’s Creek Bridge, which occurred on February 27, 1776, was the first combat of the Revolution in North Carolina. General McLeod led his soldiers into battle against the patriots while shouting, “King George and broad swords.”
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p22-66, il, map
Record #:
35698
Author(s):
Abstract:
NC’s plays about the Lost Colony of Roanoke, Blackbeard, Tom Dooley, Daniel Boone, and Andrew Jackson may come as no surprise. This state was a home for the famous pirate and Elizabethan era English settlers, the subject of the popular song, battle site for this Revolutionary War freedom fighter, and settlement that included Jackson’s parents. Plays about NC’s perhaps lesser known ways of involvement in the Revolutionary War included Fight for Freedom, about the first Declaration of Independence document; The Liberty Cart, about the Battle of Moore’s Creek. As for contributions from religious groups, there was Sound of Peace, about a Quaker settlement in Snow Camp. From this Day Forward traced the life of the Walden family, whose descendants and bakeries still exist in Valdese.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p18-21