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13 results for Theater, Open-air
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Record #:
3370
Author(s):
Abstract:
From the oldest, Manteo's THE LOST COLONY (1937) to the youngest, Polkton's RIPPLE IN THE WATER (1993), eleven outdoor dramas across the state provide entertaining evenings as well as fascinating state history.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 55 Issue 8, Aug 1997, p60, il
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Record #:
3773
Author(s):
Abstract:
The outdoor drama was born when Paul Green's THE LOST COLONY premiered in 1937 on Roanoke Island. Since then eleven outdoor dramas across the state, from Shakespeare to historical to religious, have provided evenings of entertainment.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 30 Issue 5, May 1998, p30-31, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
6849
Author(s):
Abstract:
The outdoor drama, a blending of historical story lines with singing and dancing, was created in North Carolina. The state has three of the nation's oldest-–\"The Lost Colony\" (Manteo), \"Unto These Hills\" (Cherokee), and \"Horn in the West\" (Boone). Two have sound financial footing; one does not. Vora discusses how productions are paid for and why audiences of these oldest of outdoor dramas are slipping away.
Record #:
7242
Author(s):
Abstract:
Outdoor drama as a theatrical genre was born in 1937 in the Tar Heel state when collaboration between the town of Manteo and North Carolina playwright Paul Green resulted in \"The Lost Colony\" production. This play is now the nation's oldest outdoor drama, followed by Cherokee's “Unto These Hills” and Boone's “Horn in the West” in second and third place. In the summer of 2005, nine historical drams will be in production across the state, more than any other state in the country.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 6, June 2005, p52-53, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
10139
Author(s):
Abstract:
Norris discusses the early days of the outdoor drama, THE LOST COLONY, and the effort it took to bring it to production. The play ran from 1937 till 1941, when it was suspended for World War II. Performances began again in 1946.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
11257
Author(s):
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An outdoor historical drama and dance creation has drawn national praise. Joe Layton directed \"The Lost Colony\", a musical of the historic Roanoke colony. Layton utilized local drama students to create the musical and emphasized the Native American role in the colony's history. Broadway directors have noticed the musical and praised the work. Other outdoor dramas that feature a North Carolina theme and Native American dances are \"Unto These Hills,\" about the Cherokees, and \"Horn in the West,\" about Daniel Boone.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 33 Issue 3, July 1965, p10, 15, il
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Record #:
13245
Author(s):
Abstract:
The outdoor drama was pioneered in North Carolina. The first was Paul Green's The Lost Colony. This season, which is from the last week end in June through the first week in September, there will be five of them - three in the Great Smoky and Blue Ridge Mountains, one on Roanoke Island and one in the Piedmont. The dramas depict widely different chapters of history from the disappearance of the English settlers at Roanoke Island to the sacrifice of a Cherokee martyr.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 3, June 1953, p6-7, f
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Record #:
28858
Author(s):
Abstract:
The outdoor drama, The Lost Colony, has been running in North Carolina since 1937. The Lost Colony blends music, dance, drama and history to commemorate important events. The drama is performed outdoors to depict a realistic experience close to history.
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NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 1 Issue 4, June 1985, p6-7, por
Record #:
29375
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s coastal region, with its multiplicity of small islands, inlets and coves, offered hiding places for pirates. These areas also gave pirates access to isolated coastal towns, major sea routes and commercial shipping. The legends of pirates, such as Blackbeard, live on in North Carolina, and today, they are depicted in outdoor dramas and plays.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 6, June 1981, p46-48, il, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
30745
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has thirteen outdoor theaters, more than any of the other states with outdoor dramas. The art form began in 1937 with the production of The Lost Colony in Manteo, and most of the outdoor dramas are historical dramatizations of North Carolina’s heritage or traditional theater classics. This article provides a list of 2010 summer productions and descriptions of each.
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Record #:
30802
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Abstract:
The summertime circuit of outdoor historical dramas in North Carolina starts in June. In Cherokee, Manteo, and Boone, staged shows present audiences a glimpse of life in the first English settlements, the struggle of the Cherokee Indians, and life as a southern Appalachia pioneer.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
32214
Author(s):
Abstract:
Three historical outdoor dramas are presented in North Carolina every summer. The oldest of North Carolina’s outdoor dramas is “The Lost Colony,” which portrays the events leading to the colony’s disappearance. The drama “Horn in the West” tells the story of Daniel Boone, and “Unto These Hills” portrays the struggle of the Cherokee Indians to live in peace in their own native land.
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Record #:
35876
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Abstract:
The village was lost in a sense, due to the mysterious disappearance of the original inhabitants. What was not lost, represented in dramas such as The Lost Colony. Profiled during its fortieth anniversary, its latest production proved Roanoke and the lost colonists still possessed mystique.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p36-37