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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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22 results for Striped bass
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Record #:
2397
Author(s):
Abstract:
Changes in habitat quality, toxic waste, and overfishing led to a decline of the striped bass, or rockfish, in the Albemarle Sound-Roanoke River ecosystem in the 1970s and 1980s. Regulating harvest and Roanoke River flows are helping the species recover.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 43 Issue 2, Summer 1995, p16, il
Record #:
3900
Abstract:
Striped bass fishing is at its best off the Outer Banks from September to March. However, it was not always so. In the 1970s, the species was in decline. Congressional passage of the Emergency Striped Bass Management Act began the recovery, which now allows fishermen once again to enjoy fishing for striped bass.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Autumn 1998, p28-30, il Periodical Website
Record #:
7920
Author(s):
Abstract:
Water pollution, habitat alteration, and overfishing have contributed to the decline of one of the country's best striped bass fisheries in the Albemarle Sound and Roanoke River. A project now underway in Aurora may help to reverse that trend. Using N.C. Sea Grant Program and National Coastal Research Institute research, Lee and Harvey Brothers of Aurora became the first persons in the nation to pond-raise hybrid sea bass commercially when they harvested their first crop of 70,000 pounds. The fish is a cross between a striped bass and a white fish. Venters discusses what this success means to the aquaculture industry and to the recovery of the fish in the wild.
Record #:
22761
Author(s):
Abstract:
Veteran Captain Richard Andrews details the winter fishing opportunities for Tar and Pamlico River fishermen. After describing the life patterns of striped bass, he recommends ways for maximizing catches of stripers and speckled trout.
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Record #:
25926
Author(s):
Abstract:
A two part program by the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission is undeway to improve the striped bass population in the Tarheel waters by stocking fingerling fish.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 16 Issue 2, Spring 1973, p6
Record #:
26109
Author(s):
Abstract:
Due to a successful operation at the Weldon Hatchery on the Roanoke River, over 400,000 striped bass were introduced into North Carolina state waters.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 21 Issue 4, 1977, p4, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
26300
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission is conducting a study on striped bass in the state’s coastal waters to determine if populations are declining.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 22 Issue 1, Winter 1978, p17
Subject(s):
Record #:
26323
Author(s):
Abstract:
Project crossing striped bass with white bass has been underway in several lakes in North Carolina. Young of year hybrids have been sampled in two of the four study lakes and growth rates have been well-established.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Spring 1978, p22
Subject(s):
Record #:
26434
Author(s):
Abstract:
The first stocking of striped bass has occurred in coastal North Carolina. The Cape Fear River became home to around 20,000 striped bass, some of which have been tagged for further experimentation.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 24 Issue (27) 3, Mar 1980, p16
Record #:
26521
Author(s):
Abstract:
The mysterious decline of Atlantic Coast striped bass has now been attributed to traces of arsenic and other chemicals in East Coast rivers.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 24 Issue (27) 10, Oct 1980, p11
Subject(s):
Record #:
26671
Author(s):
Abstract:
Federal and State wildlife agents uncovered a significant illegal market for striped bass from both the Chesapeake Bay and inland waters of North Carolina. These illegal harvests have likely contributed to decline in the fish population.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 32 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1985, p8, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
6634
Author(s):
Abstract:
The striped bass is to the fishermen of the coast what the trout is to the mountain stream angler - a worthy opponent. The fish once lived in coastal rivers, including the Roanoke, in tremendous numbers. However, water pollution and exploitation of natural resources have reduced it to a fraction of its former abundance. Cornell discusses its habitat and life history and importance to commercial and sport fishermen.
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Record #:
9782
Author(s):
Abstract:
Striped bass populations, once abundant in the Albemarle Sound, have dwindled over the years, affecting commercial and recreational fishermen. Among the factors contributing to the decline are the Roanoke River dams, poor egg survival, poor fry survival, and overharvesting of the spawning stock.
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Record #:
26894
Author(s):
Abstract:
Striped bass were tagged and stocked in the Neuse River near New Bern in February. Fishermen returning tags will provide Marine Fisheries biologists with valuable information on fish biology, in addition to receiving a reward.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 4, Apr 1982, p12
Subject(s):
Record #:
710
Author(s):
Abstract:
After years of study, biologists are beginning to unlock some of the mysteries of our dwindling striped bass populations in Albemarle Sound and the Roanoke River.
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