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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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9 results for North Carolina--Ecology
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Record #:
23943
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The song of cicadas is a sign that summer has arrived in North Carolina. This unique species spends the majority of its life unground, is an important part of the environment's nutrient cycle, and has existed for over 125 million years.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 23 Issue 3, Summer 2015, p2-3, il
Record #:
24832
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North Carolina is home to both resident and migrant birds throughout the year. Some birds, such as Blue Jays, are permanent residents of the state, while others, like the Prothonotary Warbler are migrants who fly to Central and South America for the winter. Other birds, like the Yellow-bellied Sapsucker migrate from Canada to North Carolina for the winter. This article describes a number of these birds and details their navigational abilities.
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Record #:
25519
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Cavity-building woodpeckers create habitats for a diverse species within the woodlands of North Carolina. The presence of woodpeckers in the forest changes everything and are classified as keystone species. This label is given to species who have a significant and far-reaching effect on the dynamics of ecosystems.
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Record #:
27285
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When one considers bears in North Carolina, they often think the majority of the species’ population is in the mountains. However, the coastal plains are now home to more bears than the western part of the state.
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Record #:
27627
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The North Carolina Sea Grant’s mission is to improve the natural resource management decisions made by the state. The organization believes the most effective way to accomplish their goal is to work with communities to improve public understanding of the issues. To succeed in this endeavor, Sea Grant has begun working with K-12 schools to better educate students about climate and natural resources.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 5, Holiday 2016, p6-8, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27666
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Biology professor, Quent Lupton, describes the Red Velvet Wasp. This type of wasp is known for its large, painful stingers and about 20 species can be found in North Carolina.
Record #:
27820
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Early spring welcomes the return of green grass and blooming flowers. In the woods and mountains of North Carolina, the Redbud tree returns.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 10, March 2017, p70-72, 74, por Periodical Website
Record #:
34508
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After inheriting his ancestral farm, agriculturist Don Lee has moved away from growing regular crops like corn and tobacco. Instead, he has transformed it into the Garrett Wildflower Seed Farm, a seed-growing operation for native wildflowers and grassland species. The seeds are bought by landowners that want to restore indigenous landscapes, companies that want to use native plants for utility projects, and projects that endeavor to reestablish pollinator plants for bees and butterflies.
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