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6 results for Jellyfishes
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Record #:
13344
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Abstract:
Jellyfish are a common sight along North Carolina's coastline. Autry explains how beachgoers can help scientists by reporting these sightings.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 2010, p21-23, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
24733
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In 2014 and 2015, ECU graduate student, Nina Sassano, studied the increase in jellyfish populations on the North Carolina coast. Her experiments revealed that an increase in the number of man-made structures in the water may cause jellyfish settlements to be more extreme, resulting in a higher density of jellyfish in coastal waters.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 5, Holiday 2015, p16-18, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25024
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Sharks are not the only water hazard found at the beach. Jellyfish stings and sting ray stings can also cause injury. If this kind of injury occurs there are several remedies that can be used and if all else fails, go see a doctor.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. 15 Issue 5, May 1988, p3-4, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8010
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There are more than two hundred species of jellyfish floating in the oceans, bays, gulfs, or sounds of the world. They are not fish at all but invertebrates that have no head, brain, heart, eyes, ears, or bones. They are well adapted to a drifting, predatory life. Zentner describes some of the ones common to North Carolina waters, including the moon jellyfish, sea nettle, mushroom jellyfish, and lion's mane. The lion's mane is the world's largest, measuring eight feet across with tentacles that reach one hundred feet.
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Record #:
29170
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Moon jellyfish found in centers all over the country derive from a group of polyps received from Charlotte's Discovery Place in 2012. For example, in the Micro World iLab, these jellyfish are then bred through time-consuming processes and sent again to other centers for research and public outreach.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 25 Issue 3, Summer 2017, p2-3, por
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Record #:
36163
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In the briny deep of the Outer Banks and waterways such as streams was a diversity of tropic and cool water life. This diversity’s attribution was in part to the Labrador Current and Gulf Stream. Displaying the diversity were the ocean’s sand tiger sharks and nettle jellyfish, the river’s largemouth bass and waterdog.