NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


7 results for North Carolina, Coastal--Ecology
Currently viewing results 1 - 7
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
24053
Author(s):
Abstract:
Typically, North Carolina beaches only report one or two shark bites per year. 2015 has been an unusual year with eight beachgoers receiving shark bites in the months of June and July. Shark researchers at UNC Chapel Hill and East Carolina University describe their findings regarding changes in shark breeding and feeding patterns, while also discussing how this relates to the sharp increase in bites.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 4, Autumn 2015, p18-23, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
24052
Author(s):
Abstract:
Southern flounder fishermen use specialized nets called gill nets to catch fish, but endangered sea turtle species often get caught in these nets. In the recent past, the government threatened to close estuarine gill net fisheries. However, a series of agencies work with the national Marine Fisheries to ensure that these gill net fisheries stay open and that endangered species are protected.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 4, Autumn 2015, p14-17, il, por, map Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
24054
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Carolina bays, which include places like Lake Waccamaw and White Lake, are natural wonders of North Carolina. The author discusses the prevailing theories of these bays' origins, as well as the array of wildlife and vegetation found there.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 4, Autumn 2015, p24-29, il Periodical Website
Record #:
24733
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 2014 and 2015, ECU graduate student, Nina Sassano, studied the increase in jellyfish populations on the North Carolina coast. Her experiments revealed that an increase in the number of man-made structures in the water may cause jellyfish settlements to be more extreme, resulting in a higher density of jellyfish in coastal waters.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 5, Holiday 2015, p16-18, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
24736
Author(s):
Abstract:
Black Sea Bass is a species of fish popular in North Carolina. Student Ian Kroll studied the inner ear bones of these fish to determine the migratory patterns of juvenile Black Sea Bass. His research shows that most fish use inshore habitats but some still use offshore habitats for nurseries.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 5, Holiday 2015, p31-33, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
27674
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Coastal Federation is a nonprofit organization that protects the natural North Carolina coast. Formed in 1982 in response to peat miners’ plans to harvest land near the Pamlico and Albemarle sounds, the federation members spend much of their time removing crab pots and other debris from coastal waters.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
27812
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences offers pelagic birding trips. During a trip last year, participants observed and learned more about Gannets, birds who breed in the Artic but migrate as far south as North Carolina in the winter.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 25 Issue 1, Winter 2017, p2-3, il