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6 results for Bangley, Chuck
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Record #:
21799
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bangley, a doctoral student in coastal resources management at East Carolina University and Chris Hickman, a commercial fisherman for thirty-nine years in the waters around Cape Hatteras, combine their knowledge and experience to search the state's coastal waters for sharks. The two discuss how the research can benefit fisheries management.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2014, p20-24, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
21800
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bangley recounts nearly twenty years of collaborative shark research between researchers at East Carolina University and commercial fishermen.
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Record #:
21911
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Abstract:
A number of sharks live in various habitats from North Carolina's estuaries to coastal waters. These include the sandbar, the most common one, sharpnose, blacktip, bull, and tiger.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 2, Spr 2014, p15-18, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
24733
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Abstract:
In 2014 and 2015, ECU graduate student, Nina Sassano, studied the increase in jellyfish populations on the North Carolina coast. Her experiments revealed that an increase in the number of man-made structures in the water may cause jellyfish settlements to be more extreme, resulting in a higher density of jellyfish in coastal waters.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 5, Holiday 2015, p16-18, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25116
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Abstract:
Coley Hughes is attempting to use fish ear bones to determine where a fish has gone and what tributaries provide the best environment for the fish. She does this by examining the chemical signatures in the fish’s ear bones.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 4, Autumn 2014, p29-31, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
22590
Author(s):
Abstract:
Margaret Garner, a doctoral candidate in East Carolina University's Coastal Resources Management Program, is using the unique environments of the Rachel Carson Reserve to see what might happen to North Carolina's coast if sea level rise continues.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2015, p28-33, il Periodical Website