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5 results for Fast food restaurants
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Record #:
4328
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Although he is in competition with fast-food giants like Hardees and Bojangles, Maurice Jennings has built Biscuitville into a $30 million business since it began in 1975. The company does not do giant franchises. Nor has it gone nationwide; all but five of the stores are within an hour's drive of the headquarters in Winston-Salem. Biscuitville sticks close to its biscuit theme and cuts out a dinner by closing at 2 p.m. Staying with these approaches has kept the company in dough.
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Record #:
5945
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Wilbur Hardee's first venture into the fast food business was Hardees, which he later sold to Jim Gardner. The Greenville resident's second venture was launched in 1963 and named Little Mint. Quinn discusses Hardee's newest restaurant chain, which now has grown to thirty-five in North and South Carolina.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 3 Issue 2, May/June 1975, p42, il
Record #:
7425
Author(s):
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Bob Jackson of Cary is senior vice president and general manager of McDonald Corporation's Raleigh Region. He oversees 665 restaurants and 32,000 employees in a region that stretches from Kentucky to Georgia and from Tennessee east to the Atlantic Ocean. McDonald's Corporation is divided into eight regions nationwide. Since 2003, the Raleigh Region has ranked in the top three in sales and customers. Sales for 2004 were over $1 billion, and each restaurant in the region served over 500,000 customers.
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Record #:
7778
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The Do Drop In was established in 1947 in Winterville, North Carolina, by Wilbur Hardee. A year later he opened another restaurant at Port Terminal, near Greenville, and in 1954, Hardee purchased a building in Greenville known as the Three Steers. At a McDonald's Fast Food restaurant in Greensboro, North Carolina, Hardee noticed that their hamburgers were grilled and thought charcoaled hamburgers would be better. To prepare hamburgers this way, he opened the original Wilbur Hardee Restaurant in Greenville in 1960. Hardee sold out to Jim Gardner the same year and by 1986 there were more than 1,500 Hardees in the southeast.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 5, Oct 1986, p25, 39, il
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Record #:
14282
Author(s):
Abstract:
Adams profiles Boddie-Noell Enterprises. Located in Rocky Mount, it is the Hardee fast-food chain's second largest franchise operator and ranks as a leader in the service category in a list of North Carolina's 100 largest privately owned companied.
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