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34 results for North Carolina--Description and travel
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Record #:
1719
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's status as one of the most biologically diverse states in the nation, with more than 100 different natural ecosystems, attracts admiring photographers from near and far.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 62 Issue 1, June 1994, p26-27, il
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Record #:
2143
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Abstract:
Living conditions, including moderate climate, low crime and taxes, affordable housing, and a high quality of life, are attracting many out-of-state retirees to coastal areas like Topsail Island, the Wilmington area, and the Crystal Coast.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 62 Issue 9, Feb 1995, p24-28, il
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Record #:
3719
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Abstract:
OUR STATE magazine is sixty-five years old. People and places sharing the birth year include author Reynolds Price, blues singer Nina Simone, Croatan National Forest, and the Alleghany County Courthouse in Sparta.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 66 Issue 1, June 1998, p56-59,62-63, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
3921
Author(s):
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The North Carolina mountains cover an area of 6,000 square miles and contain the highest peaks east of the Mississippi River. They are also the site of spectacular autumn leaf displays. Each year tourists flock to such areas as Flat Rock and Cumberland Knob to view them.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 56 Issue 10, Oct 1998, p40-47, il
Record #:
4300
Abstract:
Travelers might be confused by the many towns throughout the state that bear the same names. For example, there are seven Bethels and two former Bethels in North Carolina. A number of these communities including Bethels, Town Creeks, Concords, and Piney Greens, are profiled.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 67 Issue 4, Sept 1999, p52-54, 56, 58, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4483
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Widely traveled Bill Hensley lists some of his favorite accommodations around the state, including the Fearrington House, near Pittsboro, and the Grove Park Inn in Asheville.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 58 Issue 2, Feb 2000, p32, il
Record #:
5727
Author(s):
Abstract:
For individuals looking for new places to explore or old favorites to revisit in North Carolina, Ellis describes day trips and perfect weekends. The author divides the 52 weeks into the four seasons. Among the places and events he recommends are Beaufort, the North Carolina Pickle Festival in Mt. Olive, the Union Grove Fiddlers Contest, the state aquariums, the state's lighthouses, and Stone Mountain State Park.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 70 Issue 9, Feb 2003, p52-56, 58-60, 62-72, 74-78, 80-82, 84-91, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
5971
Author(s):
Abstract:
Weekend getaways for people living in a state blessed with historical sites and recreational opportunities are described by Hensley. Among the places listed are Waynesville, Boone, Beaufort, Wilmington, and New Bern.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 61 Issue 9, Sept 2003, p16, 18, 20-28, il
Record #:
6870
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has hundreds of sites and attractions that stretch from the mountains to the coast. Hensley lists twenty of these getaways that can be enjoyed for just a few dollars and a few gallons of gas. They include Grandfather Mountain (Linville); the Carl Sandburg Home (Flat Rock); the North Carolina Pottery Center (Seagrove); Somerset Place (Creswell); and the Wright Brothers National Memorial (Outer Banks).
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 62 Issue 9, Sept 2004, p12-15, 17-21, il
Record #:
7214
Abstract:
Using the alphabet, the writers describe twenty-six interesting places to visit during the summer months. These include the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, Bost Grist Mill, Charlotte Trolley Museum, Doughton Park, and the Zebulon Latimer House Museum.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 1, June 2005, p78-84, 86-88, 90-92, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7896
Author(s):
Abstract:
The coast is often called North Carolina's cradle of civilization--the place where a group of colonists faded into history as the 'Lost Colony,' and man took his first steps toward space on the Wright Brothers plane. Verna describes four places to visit: Deadwood in Martin County, a family-owned, western-themed park; Merchants Millpond State Park in Gates County, featuring 3,259 acres of coastal pond and southern swamp forest habitats; Somerset Place in Washington County, a 37-acre state historic site that affords a glimpse into 19th-century plantation life; and the Cape Lookout National Seashore in Carteret County, three undeveloped barrier islands half-a-mile wide containing a lost town, lighthouse, and solitude.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 38 Issue 4, Apr 2006, p74-78, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
7891
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Abstract:
The southern coastland region of North Carolina is the land of pork, tobacco, seafood, grapevines, and water activities on rivers, lakes, sounds and ocean. Gannon describes four places to visit: the Cliffs of the Neuse State Park in Wayne County; the Ingram Planetarium in Brunswick County; Poplar Grove Plantation in Pender County; and Camp Lejeune in Onslow County.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 38 Issue 4, Apr 2006, p69-73, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
12339
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While North Carolina lacks the lure of glamour resorts, high profile entertainers, and the varied night life of cities such as Las Vegas or Chicago, the accessibility of native attractions, golf, outdoor sports, skiing, natural scenery, rich history, and interesting industrial tours make the state the perfect place for meetings and conventions.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 5, Oct 1974, p12, 42, il
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Record #:
14499
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The Advertising Division of the Department of Conservation and Development has prepared a list of the points of interest in each of North Carolina's counties.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 4, June 1945, p18-20
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Record #:
15202
Author(s):
Abstract:
From the coast, plains, and mountains, Lawrence details a list of North Carolina's most captivating wonders. These include the State Capitol in Raleigh, Chimney Rock near Lake Lure on the Broad River, Blowing Rock deep in the heart of the mountains, Biltmore House near Asheville, The State Sanatorium for its unobstructed views across the Pisgah Mountains, Lake Mattamuskeet in Hyde County, and Cape Hatteras.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 7 Issue 7, July 1939, p10, 26
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