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11 results for Blowing Rock--Description and travel
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Record #:
3705
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Abstract:
Blowing Rock can accommodate a variety of tastes. For example, families can enjoy Tweetsie Railroad. For those who prefer the luxurious, there is Blowing Rock Inn. Those who like rustic surroundings can find mountain cabins.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 65 Issue 11, Apr 1998, p15-16,18, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
3704
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Abstract:
Blowing Rock, incorporated in 1889, sits 4,000 feet up in the southern Appalachians. A well-known resort area by the Civil War's end, the town today is a blend of quaint, rural atmosphere and modern amenities, including bed-and-breakfast inns and boutiques.
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Record #:
6529
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Lee recounts the history of Blowing Rock from its humble beginnings as a farm community in the early 1800s to its present-day status as a mecca for tourists and vacationers. A number of famous people have visited there, including Pearl Buck and Margaret Mitchell, and Presidents Calvin Coolidge, Herbert Hoover, and Dwight Eisenhower. The town takes its name from a rocky cliff which overlooks John's River Gorge 3,000 feet below and from the Indian legend about the rock.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 4, July/Aug 1979, p20-22, 31, il, map
Record #:
13102
Author(s):
Abstract:
Our State magazine features Blowing Rock, a town that sits astride the Watauga and Caldwell county line in the western part of the state, in its Tar Heel Town of the Month section.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 6, Nov 2010, p28-32, 34, 36, 38 , il Periodical Website
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Record #:
14555
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Abstract:
A travelogue from June 1946 through the western portion of the state records lesser known towns tucked away in the mountains. Departing from Raleigh, the writer stopped in North Wilkesboro, Jefferson, West Jefferson, Boone, Blowing Rock, and Lenoir. Brief sketches of the local businesses, history, and scenery are described for each destination.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 5, June 1946, p3-5, il
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Record #:
22333
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Abstract:
Blowing Rock, population 1,425, is located in Watauga County. Northcote provides tips on where to stay and play while visiting there.
Record #:
23648
Abstract:
Blowing Rock has been a summer getaway for visitors since the early 1900s. The author presents popular restaurants, hotels, and tourist attractions in the town.
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Record #:
34802
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Inn at Ragged Garden, a 20th century bed-and-breakfast, has one of the longest garden displays in Blowing Rock, North Carolina. From spring into late fall, a full acre of land is devoted to gardens that include oriental lilies, dahlias, petunias, and more.
Source:
Carolina Gardener (NoCar SB 453.2 N8 C37), Vol. 29 Issue 1, February 2017, p56-61, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
34893
Abstract:
The Gideon Ridge Inn in Blowing Rock, North Carolina has become a quiet getaway for many loyal guests. Originally built in 1941 as a summer retreat home, the house has since transformed into a secluded guest house that has kept its quiet charm.
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Record #:
34963
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Abstract:
The American Chestnut tree once grew all up and down the east coast, until a blight nearly wiped out the species. Today, the Green Park Inn of Blowing Rock stands as a testament to that time, restoring their chestnut wood handicrafts, serving food on chestnut planks, and naming their restaurant the Chestnut Grille.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 5, October 2017, p162-168, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
35911
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lodging profiles boasting hospitality offer a mountain of proof. Those with long standing reputations: Fairfield Inn, established 1896; Monte Vista Hotel, established 1919; Stonehearth, presently an inn, formerly antique shop and restaurant. Lodgings with a more recent reputation for comfort: Hound Ears Lodge and Club, Floridians comprising fifty percent of membership; Waynesville Country Club Inn, guest list including fraternities on ski trips; and Fontana Village Resort, fireplaces in their rooms; Sunshine Inn, inspired by the bed and breakfasts in Ireland.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 1, Jan 1981, p46-47