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10 results for Conservation of natural resources--North Carolina, Western
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Record #:
22347
Abstract:
Eleven conservationists have worked very hard to help preserve the wild and scenic places of Western North Carolina. They are Mike Leonard; Karen Cragnolin; Brian Payst; Paul Carlson; Sandy and Missy Schenck; Susie Hamrick Jones; John Humphrey; Tim Sweeney; and Jay Leutze.
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Record #:
23731
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Susie Hamrick Jones is executive director of the Foothill's Conservancy of North Carolina, based in Morganton. Jones works to prevent developers from dividing large wooded areas and she also pushes for restrictions on tree removal.
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Record #:
23866
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Bogs are among the most imperiled habitats in the mountains. In Western North Carolina, conservationists hope to bring these ecosystems back from the brink of extinction through the creation of a wildlife refuge.
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Record #:
24114
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Less than a hundred years ago, Asheville was filled with American chestnut trees. Today, few trees remain. One organization, the American Chestnut Foundation, seeks to change that by working to develop a tree that can survive blight and thrive in the area.
Record #:
24129
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In 2005, World's Edge--a series of cliffs on the Southern Blue Ridge Escarpment--came under threat of unsustainable development. Over the past ten years, public, private, and governmental agencies funded an effort to purchase the lands for conservation and trail development, which added to recreational opportunities at Chimney Rock State Park.
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Record #:
26997
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Balds are open, grassy mountaintops without trees, and are ideal sites for camping, hiking and hunting. When citizen of North Carolina Glen Tig discovered bulldozing in Stratton Bald, he went to Senator Jesse Helms for help. Further review found that Forest Service biologists incorrectly classified the bald, thereby allowing for bulldozing.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 6 Issue 23, Dec 1-15 1988, p18-21, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
29726
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Panthertown, a Blue Ridge National Heritage Area in Jackson County, North Carolina, offers a variety of experiences for outdoor enthusiasts. Public trails have been created and maintained by the Friends of Panthertown to conserve the area and improve recreational opportunities. The nonprofit group recently purchased land sold by a private landowner to increase visitor access and protect the area from development.
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Record #:
29798
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Mountain bogs in Western North Carolina are unique water-bound landscapes home to a variety of carnivorous plants, such as the mountain sweet pitcher plant, purple pitcher plant, and green pitcher plants. The Nature Conservancy and United States Fish and Wildlife Service are working to protect and restore bog areas from development and invasive species.
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Record #:
29805
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Late last year the Party Rock wildfire raged thousands of acres in the Hickory Nut Gorge and led to the evacuation of Chimney Rock. In its aftermath, the Carolina Mountain Land Conservancy is working to address concerns about the health of the forest and raise awareness about the effects of wildfire. A citizen science program is also being created to help gather data in affected areas.
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Record #:
29804
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Land protection and conservation are topics that come to mind this time of year when we celebrate Earth Day. Eight professionals from the private and public sectors talk about natural resource issues in Western North Carolina, their outlook for the future, and the best action items for concerned citizens.
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