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6 results for Plank roads
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Record #:
7934
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Around 150 years ago the longest plank road ever constructed in the world was built between Fayetteville in Cumberland County and the Moravian village of Bethania in Forsyth County. The distance was 129 miles. The Fayetteville and Western Plank Road followed a course originally laid out by Dr. Elisha Mitchell. Hairr recounts the history and construction of the road.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 2, July 2006, p76-78, 80, 82, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8458
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The plank road between New Bern and Hillsborough, often called Cornwallis' Road, was built by Governor William Tryon in 1771. Tryon sent a force of 4,000 men to quell a rebellion of Regulators who were gathered around Hillsborough. Along the way, Tryon realized that a road was needed to move his forces quickly, as rebellious hostilities were growing in western North Carolina. During the Revolutionary War, General Charles Cornwallis used the road to transport supplies and to forage the countryside. Paul Koepke moved to Durham County during the 1960s. His residence at Two-Moon Pond is located along what was the old plank road. In 1960 the road was maintained by Durham County as a rural dirt road. During the 1970s however, the road was updated and paved. Since then residential buildings and businesses have moved into the area, bringing with them roadside trash and crime.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 1, June 1983, p11-12, por
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Record #:
10298
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In the decade before the Civil War, getting goods to eastern markets from the Piedmont Region was hampered by a lack of good roads. Legislation passed in 1849 authorized construction of plank roads, and approximately 500 miles were built. Dunnagan discusses how the roads were built and who used them.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
10876
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1850s was the heyday for plank roads in North Carolina. Around a dozen roads were built with a total mileage of 500 miles. The longest plank road ever constructed in the world was built between Fayetteville in Cumberland County and the Moravian village of Bethania in Forsyth County. The distance was 129 miles.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 35 Issue 17, Feb 1968, p9-10, il
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Record #:
19424
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Plank roads formed an interesting link in the progress of transportation in the state during the antebellum period and were the forerunner of the present good roads in North Carolina. This type of road was a Russian invention. Getting goods to eastern markets from the Piedmont region was hampered by a lack of good roads and railroad lines. Legislation passed in 1849 authorized construction of plank roads in which flat wooden planks were laid closely to make a firm roadbed.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 42, Mar 1944, p4-5
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Record #:
6202
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In the early 19th-century getting goods to eastern markets from the Piedmont region was hampered by a lack of good roads and railroad lines. Legislation passed in 1849 authorized construction of plank roads in which flat wooden planks were laid closely to make a firm roadbed. Ratcliff discusses how the roads were built and who used them. Plank roads had a short existence; expansion of railroad lines ended its use shortly before the Civil War.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 20 Issue 3, Winter 1981, p13-16, il, map, bibl, f
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