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5 results for Roads--Outer Banks
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Record #:
2988
Author(s):
Abstract:
Nearly fifty years old on some parts, N.C. Highway 12 connects the Outer Banks' towns of Corolla and Ocracoke. A vital lifeline for residents, the road is constantly the prey of shifting sands and ocean overwash.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 64 Issue 3, Aug 1996, p30-32, il
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Record #:
3414
Author(s):
Abstract:
Driving the 112-mile length of Highway 12, which connects Ocracoke and Corolla on the Outer Banks, affords people some of the most beautiful coastal views in the country and a sense of yesterday.
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Full Text:
Record #:
13522
Author(s):
Abstract:
Another state highway already is planned down the banks of coastal North Carolina - one that will be a boon to vacationists and will open a considerable tract of land for development. This road - yet in blueprint stage - will start just north of Kitty Hawk; then it will go south, paralleling the highway which now follows the beach front, except that this new one will be a mile or two westward and will skirt the sound shore.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 40, Mar 1954, p1-2, 23, map
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Full Text:
Record #:
30971
Author(s):
Abstract:
Beside the old blacktop highway on the Dare County, North Carolina beaches, the new $888,000 paved road has opened to traffic. It extends form Southern Shores at Kitty Hawk to Kill Devil Hills, connecting with the new scenic highway built by Cape Hatteras National Seashore.
Subject(s):
Record #:
36001
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mrs. Maggie Austin’s story, people from small towns like Frisco and decades past could relate to. In her youth, common were one-room schoolhouses and schooling stopped at the seventh grade, traveling by boat and on dirt roads. For all the disadvantages focused on by younger generations and city residents, she asserted Hatteras Island to be the best place to live.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 3, Spring 1978, p48-49