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18 results for Gold mines and mining--History
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Record #:
4283
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In 1799, the first documented gold strike in the nation occurred at John Reed's farm twenty miles east of Charlotte. As the news spread, gold seekers poured in, transforming sleepy Charlotte into a boomtown. In the 1820s, the state produced all of the native gold coined by the U.S. Mint, over a million dollars. By 1849, the gold seekers were heading for California, and the boom faded. Today the John Reed Gold Mine, a National Historic Landmark and State Historic Site, is the state's third-most visited historic site.
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Record #:
8439
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In 1799, the first documented gold strike in the country occurred at John Reed's farm in Cabarrus County, twenty miles east of Charlotte. Reed had been a Hessian soldier who had deserted the British cause. The gold was the first native gold to be used by the U.S. Mint, and the discovery meant that America would not have to depend on European mines for gold. In 1828, a second gold strike was made in Burke County. Gold mining became the leading industry of the state after farming. For the next fifty years, until the California Gold Rush of 1849, North Carolina led the nation in gold mining.
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Record #:
13603
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Before California had dreamed of the discovery of gold, the Old North State was humming with mining activity - for it was in North Carolina and not California that gold was first discovered in the United States.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 7, July 1951, p21-22
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Record #:
13661
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Until 1810, North Carolina produced all the gold mined in the United States.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 28, Dec 1951, p7
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Record #:
15049
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There was a gold rush in North Carolina during the early 19th-century, and the state also had its own privately owned mint run by Christopher Bechtler and recognized by the Federal Government.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 12, Aug 1940, p8-9
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Record #:
15923
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The first discovery of gold in the state was found on John Reed's farm in 1799. Twenty miles east of Charlotte, the Reed Gold Mine State Historic Site was scene for the bicentennial celebrations of the Southeast's largest gold-producing state.
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Record #:
19923
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This is the first of a two-part article looking at gold mining in North Carolina in the early 19th century as well as its resurgence during the period of the Great Depression. This installment includes the history of gold discoveries in the region and the state dating from the time of the explorers as well as a detailed look at the establishment and organization of gold mining in North Carolina.
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Record #:
19926
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This is the second of a two-part article looking at gold mining in North Carolina in the early 19th century as well as its resurgence during the period of the Great Depression. This installment includes a look at the foreign influences on north Carolina gold mining, on the uses of the State gold, on the establishment of a mint, and the decline of mining operations.
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Record #:
21431
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The Gold Hill mining district of south-central North Carolina was an important gold producing area during 1842-1853. By the early 1850s Gold Hill established itself as a rewarding mining region but its development was hindered by a lack of specialized knowledge in deep mining methods, the reluctance of residents to turn over agricultural lands to gold prospectors, shortage of skilled miners, lack of investment capital, and an excess of competition between mining companies.
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Record #:
23729
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North Carolina was home to the first gold rush in the U.S., the sole source of gold between 1804 and 1827. One particularly lucrative area was the Blue Ridge Mountains. A jeweler named Christopher Bechtler (1782-1842) helped mint North Carolinas gold into coins.
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Record #:
24568
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Gold was mined commercially in Franklin County for almost one hundred years from its discovery in 1835. This article presents the boom and subsequent decline of gold digging in Franklin County.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 39 Issue 21, April 1972, p10-12, il
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Record #:
24943
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Part of a twelve part series, The Story of Charlotte: Part 3 talks about the gold rush in Charlotte starting in 1799. People from all over rush in to make their fortune in gold. Over the next decades, the rush accelerated until the recession in 1837.
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Record #:
7958
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In 1799, the first documented gold strike in the country occurred at John Reed's farm in Cabarrus County, twenty miles east of Charlotte. As the news spread, gold seekers of many nationalities poured in to seek their fortunes. The first mining that was conducted was called \"placer\" mining, or mining that is done aboveground. In 1825, Matthias Barringer discovered that gold could be found in veins of white quartz. By following the veins deep into the ground more gold could be recovered. Many of the miners left the state when gold was discovered in other Southern states and in California in 1849.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 45 Issue 2, Spring 2006, p20-21, il, map
Record #:
27996
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Following the Tuscarora Indian War in 1711-1712, North Carolina realized the need for a money system. During the colonial period, hard currency continued to be scarce until recognition of the Reed Gold Mine in 1799. The state experienced a massive gold rush until the early 1800s, and since then, the exchange system has continued to evolve.
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Record #:
30799
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Progress was made on the newest three NC historic sites. In Cabarrus county, stabilizing infrastructure was placed at Reed Gold Mine, the site of the country's first documented discovery of gold. North Carolina is in the process of recording the deed to the 37-acre Duke Homestead site, which will remain a living history site while adding a visitor's center and tobacco history museum. NC is waiting on approval for plans to improve Fort Dobbs in Statesville.
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