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10 results for Roberts, Bruce
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Record #:
8439
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In 1799, the first documented gold strike in the country occurred at John Reed's farm in Cabarrus County, twenty miles east of Charlotte. Reed had been a Hessian soldier who had deserted the British cause. The gold was the first native gold to be used by the U.S. Mint, and the discovery meant that America would not have to depend on European mines for gold. In 1828, a second gold strike was made in Burke County. Gold mining became the leading industry of the state after farming. For the next fifty years, until the California Gold Rush of 1849, North Carolina led the nation in gold mining.
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Record #:
10640
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If no action is taken before August 8, 1971 the nearly completed Albert Schweitzer Memorial Hospital at Balsam Grove, NC and its surrounding 350 acres of land may never serve the need envisioned by its founders, Dr. Gaine Cannon and Dr. Schweitzer. Dr. Cannon died almost four years ago leaving a nearly completed hospital stacked high with donated supplies and furniture. His will stipulates that if any organization or individual takes over the hospital and makes it operational within five years of his death, the foundation would lease them the facility indefinitely for one dollar a year. If that condition is not met by the date above, all property will revert to his heirs.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 38 Issue 16, Jan 1971, p12-14, il, por
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Record #:
12334
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The surgical set used to amputate General Stonewall Jackson's arm changed hands several times before being donated to The Country Doctor Museum in Bailey, North Carolina. One of Jackson's surgeons, Dr. Matthew Moore Butler, had the responsibility of preserving the instruments and bringing them home to Bristol, Tennessee. The instruments had been placed in a barrel filled with hot wax and were brought home at the end of the war. Roberts recounts how the instruments arrived at the Country Doctor Museum.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 4, Sept 1974, p18-19, il, por
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Record #:
4489
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Fearing that Federal troops would capture the Fresnel lens in the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, Confederate soldiers removed it and shipped it inland to Washington, then Tarboro. With the Union threatening destruction of Washington if the lens wasn't returned, Dr. David Tayloe assumed responsibility for the lens and carried it to safety by boxcar to his home in Townsville in what is now Vance County. Tayloe died in 1884. The whereabouts of the forty-five boxes containing the Fresnel lens remain a mystery to this day.
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Record #:
4561
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In 1890, the U.S. Government awarded experienced marine contractors Anderson & Barr of New Jersey a contract to build a lighthouse on Diamond Shoals, nine miles off Cape Hatteras. The Shoals, an area of strong undersea currents and shifting sands, has doomed many a ship and mariner. It was more than a match for the contractors, despite their heroic efforts. Unable to keep the lighthouse base level because of shifting sands, the workforce withdrew on July 4, 1891, in the face of a hurricane which destroyed the remains of the lighthouse.
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Record #:
4560
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While many people know the state's seven famous coastal lighthouses, few know that in the 19th-century North Carolina had dozens of sound and river lighthouses. Standing twelve feet above the water, these two-story, four-sided structures of a 1,000 square feet functioned like today's highway markers. The lighthouses at Croatan River, Roanoke Marshes River, Long Shoal River, Neuse River, Roanoke River, and Pamlico Point are profiled.
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Record #:
4557
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North Carolina's seven lighthouses - Currituck Beach, Bodie Island, Cape Hatteras, Ocracoke, Cape Lookout, Bald Head, and Oak Island - are profiled.
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Record #:
4772
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Thousands of ships have met disaster off North Carolina's Outer Banks. The authors describe the fate of three lost in the 19th-century: the HURON, METROPOLIS, and the CRISSIE WRIGHT.
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Record #:
30827
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Bruce Roberts is a North Carolina photographer, journalist and author. In his new book, Just Yesterday, Roberts presents details of what North Carolina looked like in the mid-to-late twentieth century. Divided into the state’s geographic regions, images show the people and places of the Outer Banks, east, piedmont, and mountains.
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Record #:
31636
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John Foster West of Wilkes County is a writer of Appalachian folklore and folkways. West and photographer Bruce Roberts published a book of poems and photographs of life in the Blue Ridge Mountains. Selections from their book, “This Proud Land,” are presented in this article.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan 1975, p6-7, il, por Periodical Website