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4 results for Roberson, Elizabeth
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Record #:
7745
Author(s):
Abstract:
By the spring of 1862, Eastern North Carolina was already feeling the effects of the Civil War. Coastal fortifications at Washington, Plymouth, and New Bern were under federal occupation. Confederate forces still maintained control of the entire area west of Greenville, Kinston, Goldsboro, and Wilmington. The area between the U.S. and Confederate occupied areas suffered greatly. In November 1862, Major General John G. Foster, U.S.A., received orders to attack Confederate regiments in Martin County. Considered to be just as devastating as Sherman's march through Georgia, Foster's Raid covered about ninety-four miles in Martin County. Over two million dollars worth of property damage was done and nothing of military value was accomplished.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 3, Aug 1986, p8-11, il, map
Full Text:
Record #:
8146
Author(s):
Abstract:
During World War II, eastern North Carolina became the home of several prisoner-of-war camps. Roberson focuses on the Williamston camp, where prisoners began arriving in 1943. Italians prisoners arrived first; however, they were soon moved to Butner. Following the Italians, German prisoners began to arrive. These soldiers had served in North Africa in Rommel's Africa Corps. In Williamston, the prisoners found work filling the labor roles of American men who had been drafted. Labor rules regarding the prisoners were dictated by the Geneva Convention. The Germans were allowed to furnish the camp with gardens and other decorations. They were even allowed to build a recreation building. Friendships between the prisoners and civilians grew and continued following the war. Several of the German soldiers have returned to Williamston to revisit the site of their incarceration as well as to reunite with old friends.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 3, Aug 1984, p4, por
Full Text:
Record #:
35628
Author(s):
Abstract:
The public education experience for many in decades past was spent in one room schoolhouses. The people of Williamston were reminded of that experience. It came with the arrival of the Poplar Point School, constructed circa Civil War and lately restored to its original condition. With its migration from this small town came reminders of that way of life for students. It was one different in many ways and better in some ways, to the author’s estimation.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 5, Oct 1977, p34-36
Record #:
4442
Abstract:
Computer technology creates businesses across the state and also provides solutions to keeping older companies in business. Gray examines a start-up software company in Durham, WebWide Information Systems, Inc., and looks at two older companies, Royal Park Uniforms, Inc. in Prospect Hill and Century Valdese, Inc. in Hickory, to see how new technology helped the companies stay competitive.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 20 Issue 2, Feb 2000, p24-25, 27-30, 33-47, il Periodical Website