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10 results for Historical reenactments
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Record #:
3083
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Around the world, over 20,000 individuals recreate the military lifestyle of the American Civil War with historical accuracy in dress and battles. Over 600 reenactors in 15 units in the state bring local history to life.
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Record #:
4486
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Over 50,000 individuals in North Carolina and around the world participate in recreating the Civil War period with historical accuracy in dress and battles. The participants are drawn to reenacting through a love of history, the chance to play on opposing sides to gain the opponent's perspective, camaraderie, family participation, and the spiritual aspect of being where family members fought or died.
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Record #:
4963
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A number of North Carolina citizens participate in recreating the Revolutionary War period with historical accuracy in dress and battle. Reenacting can be expensive, with uniforms and accessories costing thousands of dollars. Revolutionary War reenactments, having between 300 and 500 participants, are smaller than Civil War ones, which can have thousands.
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Record #:
7265
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When members of the New York Knickerbockers baseball team marched off to fight in the Civil War, they took the game and rules with them and played during their time in camps. James Constantine, a divinity student at Duke University, now serves as chaplain of the 26th Regiment of North Carolina Troops Reactivated. He wants to develop a vintage baseball team that will play the game as Civil War soldiers played it.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 2, July 2005, p110, 112, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9001
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Members of the North Carolina Historical Reenactment Society typically reenact scenes from the Civil War. Striving to stay as authentic as possible, the society demonstrates not only military life but also civilian life of the time.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 9, Feb 1981, p20-21, il
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Record #:
12299
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Garrison discusses what Civil War reenactors seek to accomplish and some of the history of the 26th Regiment North Carolina Troops. The 26th is the largest single reenactment group in the state and one of the largest in the country.
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Record #:
13881
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The reconstructed Ocanaluftee Cherokee Village offers spectators a chance to view Native Americans in their natural setting. Representations of traditional art work, boat building, and architecture are captured in photographic illustrations that are meant to depict life 200 years ago.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 51, May 1953, p12-14, il
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Record #:
31609
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The 1847 Setzer School is a restored one-room school house in Salisbury, North Carolina. Each fall, for the past two years, visiting school children experience a re-enactment of a typical school day in the nineteenth century. The experience is historically accurate as possible, demonstrating how life, culture, and educational practices have changed over one-hundred years.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 8 Issue 1, Jan 1976, p6-8, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
34821
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The author is both a gardener and Civil War reenactor who participates in the reenactment of the Battle of Manassas, fought in 1861. During the 2006 reenactment, weather conditions at the battlefield mimicked those 145 years earlier; the temperature was recorded at 107 degrees Fahrenheit. Historically, Union forces retreated the morning of the final battle and Confederate soldiers did not pursue. The reenactment followed suite, however the reenactors finally understood the impact heat had on the battle—Confederate forces had neither the energy nor the enthusiasm to follow their enemy. Pierce further discusses the impact that weather has had on the energy and efforts of those living in southern states.
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Record #:
34827
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Old Salem, located on the outskirts of Winston-Salem, North Carolina, host spectacular historical gardens. All vegetables, flowers, and herbs grown at the gardens are historically accurate to what one would find prior to the 1800s. Garden plots are also based off of Moravian documents that have survived through time.
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Carolina Gardener (NoCar SB 453.2 N8 C37), Vol. 29 Issue 8, October 2017, p56-60, il, por Periodical Website