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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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5 results for Vineyards
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Record #:
27814
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cypress Bend Vineyards in Wagram, North Carolina opened in 2005 after owners Dan and Tina Smith moved back to the land where Dan’s family first settled in 1807.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 10, March 2017, p48, 50, il, por, map Periodical Website
Record #:
29801
Author(s):
Abstract:
Chuck and Jeannie Blethen own the Blue Ridge Vineyard in Madison County, North Carolina. They have years of experience in organic viticulture, specializing in the growing of Katuah muscadine grapes. The Blethens believe grape production may be one piece in a complex solution to helping farmers diversify from tobacco and moving mountain agriculture forward.
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Record #:
31724
Author(s):
Abstract:
While the Teensy Winery may not be able to compete with the larger operations in the state in terms of volume, they are believed to be on par in quality. Bob Howard’s vineyard sits on about a third acre behind his house in the dry county of Rutherford. Howard contributes that quality of his product partly to being located in a microclimate that is perfect for growing grapes.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 3, Aug 1991, p22-23, il, por
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Record #:
31723
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author quickly outlines the history of wine making in North Carolina before highlighting some of the state’s current offerings. From large scale operations like that of the Biltmore Estate Winery to the small outfits like The Teensy Winery in Union Mills, production styles in North Carolina range from Traditional European style to traditional Tar Heel scuppernong varieties.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 3, Aug 1991, p18-21, il
Full Text:
Record #:
35776
Author(s):
Abstract:
Winemaking, starting during the 16th century, had become an important state and national industry by the 19th. Winemakers that contributed to its state and national prominence included Paul Garrett. In fact, by the early twentieth century, his five wineries were producing the best-selling brand in the America, “Virginia Dare.” As for modern day winemakers Stanley believed spurred this tradition’s comeback, they included Duplin Wine Cellars in Rose Hill.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 6, Oct 1979, p26-28