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19 results for Polk, James K. (James Knox), 1795-1849
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Record #:
1940
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Abstract:
James K. Polk, born in Pineville, is being reconsidered by historians and is moving up the ladder of presidential rankings.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 62 Issue 5, Oct 1994, p44, por
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Record #:
2487
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James K. Polk, eleventh president of the United States, was born near Pineville in Mecklenburg County. State celebrations marking the 200th anniversary of his birth will culminate on November 5, 1995, at the James K. Polk Historic Site near Pineville.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 63 Issue 4, Sept 1995, p4, il
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Record #:
2555
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The state has observed the 200th anniversary of the birth of James K. Polk, eleventh President of the United States, with a year-long series of events. Polk was born on November 2, 1795.
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Record #:
2641
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Born in Pineville, James K. Polk, the nation's eleventh President, was the first dark-horse candidate to win the office. He made just four campaign promises and kept them all.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 63 Issue 7, Dec 1995, p30-31, por
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Record #:
7599
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James K. Polk, eleventh president of the United States, was born in Mecklenburg County on November 2, 1795. Polk's life and career was divided between North Carolina and Tennessee. He was graduated from the University of North Carolina but lived thereafter in Tennessee. He served in Congress for fourteen years and became Speaker of the House of Representatives in 1835. Later he ran for president in 1844, campaigning on a pledge to serve just one term. As president, Polk championed the cause of westward expansion of the United States, settled the Oregon boundary dispute with England, and gained Congressional recognition of a state of war with Mexico and the annexation of Texas.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 8, Jan 2006, p25-27, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
10209
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James Knox Polk of Mecklenburg County was the eleventh President of the United States. As president, Polk championed the cause of westward expansion of the United States - which was known as Manifest Destiny, settled the Oregon boundary dispute with England, and gained congressional recognition of a state of war with Mexico and the annexation of Texas.
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Record #:
10403
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Chapel Hill is building a dormitory named after famous alumnus James Polk. Polk, United State President and Mecklenburg County native, attended Chapel Hill in the 1810s. Polk's school roommate was William D. Moseley, later Governor of Florida. As president, Polk returned to the university in 1847 and he visited with high ranking staff members.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 15, Jan 1967, p9, 14, por
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Record #:
10769
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James K. Polk was the first dark horse candidate to become President of the United States, his quick rise to the top being a matter of consternation in some quarters. Having been defeated twice in reelection bids for the office of Governor of Tennessee in 1841 and 1843, many felt that his political star was descending at the time of the 1845 presidential election. Born in Mecklenburg County on November 2, 1795, Polk's family moved to Tennessee when he was eleven years old, but he returned to his home state in 1815 to attend the University of North Carolina at the age of 23, graduating at the head of his class.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 36 Issue 4, July 1968, p9, 26, il
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Record #:
10790
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The home of the 11th United States President James K. Polk was located in Mecklenburg County. Though home is gone, a brick pyramid remains, honoring the birthplace. North Carolina bought the land and restored the memorial, creating the Polk Memorial Park in 1966.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 22, Apr 1967, p11-12, il
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Record #:
12589
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Designated by a pile of stones shaped into a pyramid, the location of James K. Polk's birthplace can be seen in Mecklenburg County. Erected by the Mecklenburg Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, between 1845 through 1849, the stone pyramid served as a temporary monument prior to renovations that included improved road access, a new museum, a guest center, log homestead, and a rebuilt honorary pyramid.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 22, Apr 1967, p11-12, il
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Record #:
14235
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This article is about North Carolina's 19th Century candidates for high office, most notably, James K. Polk and Andrew Jackson.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 15, Sept 1948, p11
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Record #:
18381
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North Carolina native James K. Polk took office as the 11th president of the United States in 1845. Polk promised acquisition of territories in New Mexico and California--this led to a declaration of war in which many North Carolinians participated.
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Record #:
19761
Abstract:
This article is the fifth in this series of reprinted letters between North Carolinians and James K. Polk. Material was edited from the manuscript collections of the Library of Congress which in 135 bound volumes of Polk's papers. These documents are reprinted here to demonstrate important themes and issues of the era for the state's citizens.
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Record #:
19775
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This article is the seventh in this series of reprinted letters between North Carolinians and James K. Polk. Material was edited from the manuscript collections of the Library of Congress which in 135 bound volumes of Polk's papers. These documents are reprinted here to demonstrate important themes and issues of the era for the state's citizens. Letters date from December 1836 through September 1847.
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Record #:
19772
Abstract:
This article is the sixth in this series of reprinted letters between North Carolinians and James K. Polk. Material was edited from the manuscript collections of the Library of Congress which in 135 bound volumes of Polk's papers. These documents are reprinted here to demonstrate important themes and issues of the era for the state's citizens. Letters date from February 1847 through July 1847.
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