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14 results for Sea Chest Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978
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Record #:
7820
Abstract:
The Honduran freighter, OMAR BABUN, came ashore on the Outer Banks on May 14, 1954, about three miles north of the Chicamacomico Coast Guard Station in Rodanthe. In this SEA CHEST interview, Ed McLeod recounts the story of the last breeches buoy rescue on Hatteras Island, how the ship was unloaded, and what finally happened to the vessel.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p12-14, il
Record #:
7819
Author(s):
Abstract:
The MONITOR, a Union ironclad, went to the bottom in a storm off Cape Hatteras on December 31, 1862. The resting place of ship was not discovered until 1973. In 1975, the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration declared the site the first marine sanctuary. State underwater archaeologist, Gordon Watts discusses how the wreck was discovered and the possibility of raising the ship.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p6-11, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
36004
Author(s):
Abstract:
Old time crabbing meant trot lines instead of wire pots, and income of three cents a pound versus the contemporary rate of twelve. From Edward Scarborough’s observations about facts like these, one ironic conclusion could be drawn. A better living could be made in the midst of the Great Depression than forty years later.
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Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p18-21
Record #:
36005
Author(s):
Abstract:
The school system as she knew it back then: one room buildings, students of all ages taught together, and a salary of thirty five dollars a month. It may be surprising, then, for her to conclude those conditions better. A common explanation may be a salary almost a tenth of a contemporary salary stretching further. A less common conclusion may echo Leona Meekins’: God’s providence provided a fortunate and richly lived life.
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Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p22-25
Record #:
36003
Author(s):
Abstract:
It had dominated short wave radio broadcasts on September 12, 1944, and still dominated the memories of many residents. Power to generate remembrance could be explained by the winds, exceeding 100 miles per hour, and 96 of the 115 homes damaged or washed off their blocks. Perhaps, though, a greater explanation can lie in no human casualties or homes badly damaged. From that, God at work in the midst of Mother Nature’s wrath was a possibility still speculated.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p16-17
Record #:
36007
Abstract:
With its water encroached existence, who became known later as Coast Guard was a natural need. Generations of Midgetts keeping the occupational tradition alive proved its value measured in ways deeper than the coastal waters. A collective generational expression was the Chicamacomico Historical Society's upkeep of one of the lifesaving stations. Efforts by a younger generation came from the Cape Hatteras High School Chicamacomico Lifesavers Club.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p29-33
Record #:
36002
Abstract:
High winds and tides had worn down the terrain, but human activities had played a great part in the erosion of sand dunes and beaches. Having some control over the latter spurred residents to plan ways to preserve the sandy shores of their island home. Among the efforts: prohibiting vehicles without four weight bearing wheels on beaches; increasing parking spaces to incite pedestrian beach access; and closing certain areas seasonally and year around.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p2-5
Record #:
36010
Author(s):
Abstract:
Called the gateway to Hatteras Island, the bridge built in the 1960s and named after Senator Herbert Bonner was experiencing the wear and tear of commuting use. Limitations on its daily use were imposed during its repair period. Such an occasion made Island residents all the more aware of the bridge’s importance in their way of life.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p46-47
Record #:
36009
Author(s):
Abstract:
Touted as the first four-masted schooner to wreck on the Outer Banks, the George A. Kohler, was destroyed not by the hurricane that had washed it ashore, but the second buyer of its remains. Its value at that time could be measured in the dollars exchanged for its scrap iron and steel. Its present and intrinsic value can be seen in speculations of a shipwreck eight miles from Avon being the sunken schooner.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p42-45
Record #:
36008
Abstract:
A fading art kept alive yet by quilters such as Mrs. Charlotte Balance. Tales told by Mrs. Nettie Gibson revealed changes in quilting standards. Decades ago, the summer and winter quilting parties noted by Mrs. Ballance made it a commonly collective activity. The experience, then, was quite different from the common contemporary practice of quilting as a solo project.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p41
Record #:
36006
Abstract:
Built in Morehead City during the Great Depression, it was the first ferry to run on Hatteras Island. With its important role, the Hadeco became more than a form of human transport or mail delivery. It helped to define a way of life for decades to come.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p26-28
Record #:
36011
Author(s):
Abstract:
The resident named for her father’s mule or a family member held values characteristic of Hatteras Island life, such as deep religious beliefs. Activities betraying the time in which she grew up included her mother sewing clothes for a family of twelve. Ways she made a personal mark on her world included opening her home to tourists and village newcomers alike. From such acts of hospitality, a life commonly lived might also be called an uncommon life.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p48-52
Record #:
36012
Author(s):
Abstract:
Were they papers worth far more than the paper they were printed on? That question was prompted by the discovery of documents, letters, and receipts in the former wreck commissioner’s 150 year old house. A photocopied septet of documents, all over 110 years old, were available for readers to decide for themselves whether the items were trash or treasure.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p54-57
Record #:
36013
Abstract:
Woodworks that became part of the Sea Chest’s “Crafts Curators” collection included decoys and boats carved by Moody Austin and flying birds constructed by Preston Stowe.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p60-61