NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


11 results for Quilts
Currently viewing results 1 - 11
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
20174
Abstract:
The Quilt Trails of the Tar River, a project of the Franklin County Arts Council, displays quilt blocks around the upper Tar River area of the county and surrounding countryside. These art pieces, placed on historic buildings and structures mark the history, agriculture, and scenic byways of the region.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 45 Issue 7, Jul 2013, p14, il, map, f Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
29803
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Western North Carolina Quilters Guild will host a two-day juried quilt show in Flat Rock this May. The show will display over one-hundred quilts from across the mountain region, and teach visitors about quilt styles and quilting techniques.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
31380
Author(s):
Abstract:
For the past ten years, Georgia Bonesteel of Hendersonville has been practicing and teaching lap quilting, a method of making a quilt in small sections and assembling them for the finished product. Bonesteel says the method offers people a way of hanging on to an important part of our heritage and adapt it to today’s lifestyle. This article discusses Bonesteel’s lap quilting technique, and provides a sample of instructions.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 15 Issue 1, Jan 1983, p8-9, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31374
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jane Long of Cary has won the blue ribbon for best quilt in the show at the North Carolina State Fair for the fourth year in a row. Her latest winning entry, an original design, shows an Amish influence, with quilting done in black thread. This article discusses Long’s quilting techniques, patterns, and materials.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
35848
Abstract:
Was quilting’s comeback because, as Faulker speculated, of the current energy crisis or colder winters? Whatever the cause, the author was appreciative for the revival of interest that had also resurged warm memories.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 3, Apr 1980, p8
Subject(s):
Record #:
36016
Abstract:
It was a lost art to America in general, perhaps. In Hatteras Island, Mrs. Brittie Burrus proved interest in quilting could be found in girls who were part of the Methodist Church’s Day Circle.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1980, p62-63
Record #:
36008
Abstract:
A fading art kept alive yet by quilters such as Mrs. Charlotte Balance. Tales told by Mrs. Nettie Gibson revealed changes in quilting standards. Decades ago, the summer and winter quilting parties noted by Mrs. Ballance made it a commonly collective activity. The experience, then, was quite different from the common contemporary practice of quilting as a solo project.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p41
Record #:
36022
Abstract:
A library’s archives typically contain donations of letters and documents. For Hatteras Island’s Library, a 125 year old quilt reflected what the town’s culture perceived as preservation worthy. Current creators of these quilts, in discussing the tradition of quilt-making, also proved that the “Human Library” concept is not so new.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Fall/Winter 1982, p20-21
Record #:
36383
Abstract:
The Farmer-James collection of quilts was a traveling exhibit from January 20-March 14, 2003. It included 37 quilts ranging from Civil War era to the mid-twentieth century. It showcases the difference between folkloristic and artistic treatments of quilt making traditions.
Record #:
36380
Abstract:
Different patterns on quilts made by African Americans used to be a form of communication in the Underground Railroad. Ten to twelve different patterns were used to inform fugitive slaves as to what their next action should be. Although quilting patterns are no longer used for these purposes, patterns are still very important within African American quilting communities.
Record #:
38146
Author(s):
Abstract:
Quilting through the centuries has experienced vast changes in purposes and patterns. Originally a padding for Crusaders’ armor, it gained popularity in the United States through communities such as Amish, community quilting bees, and fads such as the Log Cabin and crazy quilt. Quilting still has a presence in many communities through church quilting groups and community center classes, who can teach styles such as appliqued or pierced.