NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


13 results for Tar Heel Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980
Currently viewing results 1 - 13
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
6563
Author(s):
Abstract:
Parker discusses the life and artistic creations of Edgar Alexander McKillop. McKillop, an obscure mountain man with little formal education from the community of Balfour, is recognized as a great folk artist. His fame rests on thirty-three large walnut sculptures he created in the 1920s and 1930s.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p20-22, il
Record #:
6564
Author(s):
Abstract:
The ponies on Ocracoke have been around for centuries. Some myths which have evolved around them say no one knows where they came from; the animals are wild; the animals are ponies; and the horses are unique to Ocracoke. Bragdon explores some of the more popular myths, such as these, and some 20th-century facts.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p43-45, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
35875
Author(s):
Abstract:
The gamut of the Mountain experience, the author asserted was in the touted “heart of the Great Smoky Mountains.” Giving authenticity were descriptions of Soco Gardens Zoo; Meadowbrook Resort; Red Barn Gift Shop; and authentically recreated western town, Ghost Town in the Sky.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p31-33
Record #:
35873
Author(s):
Abstract:
What lends the Outer Banks mystique, may obviously lie in towns not widely known such as Duck. A source of mystique not so well known was one Tar Heel natives like Nell Wise Wechter debate: the name's origins. Seeking places to sup while touring the town touting mystique included Wanchese’s Fishermen’s Wharf, Nag Head’s Dareolina, and Kill Devil Hill’s Top of the Dunes.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p25-27
Record #:
35869
Abstract:
Faulkner shared her version of childhood summer vacations from school, a rural Martin County experience markedly different from how many children today experience that three month break. From her reflection, she asserted that the children of yesteryear knew vacations as they were meant to be.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p10
Record #:
35878
Author(s):
Abstract:
Roanoke was getting ready for its quadricentennial celebration. Part of the preparation: building a replica of the ship that brought the colonists ashore and Lost Colony Center near Waterside Theatre. As for the celebration, flora and fauna paintings of disappeared colonist John White was being remembered as much as the disappearance itself.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p40-41
Record #:
35871
Author(s):
Abstract:
This feud’s source was not of the Hatfield and McCoy ilk: it was a refinery for Carteret County. Pete Dorrance owned the business he promised was economically sound and environmentally clean. Against it was John Costlow, director of Duke University Marine Laboratory. He asserted a threat of oil spills carried an ecological damage price tag too high to pay.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p14-17
Record #:
35880
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fashion often comes back around, Ray proved, albeit not through discussing clothing styles. This fashion was a water-borne sport. The appeal of it was asserted through casual attire and inexpensive equipment, an inner tube. Adding to the allure were plenteous places to indulge in the sport, such as Green, Broad, Yadkin, Catawba, and Little Tennessee Rivers.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p51, 63
Record #:
35870
Author(s):
Abstract:
A popular vacation spot for people from both sides of the Mason-Dixon Line, the Outer Banks retained a mystique. This quality, Wise claims the other area noted, the Mountains, lacks. He noted it as an irony: the Mountains have retained a claim to the past that granted it legend status.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p13
Record #:
35872
Author(s):
Abstract:
The title wasn’t an allusion to Theodore Dreiser’s novel, but solar power, lately harnessed by suburbanites. Among them were the Adamczyks and Jones, who have discovered the virtues of this alternative fuel source. Virtues highlighted: saving the environment and on one’s utility bill.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p18-19
Record #:
35877
Author(s):
Abstract:
The town boasting of lagoons and wildlife, sand dunes and woods, had existed less than forty years. No less important than one existing a little less than four hundred years (Roanoke) was town incorporated the year prior, though. The author proved its lack of gaudiness, found in other resort towns, offered Southern Shores equitable allure to vacationers and NC residents alike.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p38-39
Record #:
35874
Abstract:
Peace and freedom: states of being Vic Gillispie, resident of a land eighty percent surrounded by water, also endeavored. What was exceptional about this Dare County painter’s endeavor: his refusal to paint the ocean. Instead of representing the nautical environment on a canvas, he preferred to paint nautical-related objects like decoys.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p28-29
Record #:
35876
Author(s):
Abstract:
The village was lost in a sense, due to the mysterious disappearance of the original inhabitants. What was not lost, represented in dramas such as The Lost Colony. Profiled during its fortieth anniversary, its latest production proved Roanoke and the lost colonists still possessed mystique.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p36-37