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6 results for Faulkner, Janice Hardison, 1932-
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Record #:
3279
Author(s):
Abstract:
When Governor James Hunt needs a problem cleaned up, he sends in Janice Faulkner. The former East Carolina University administrator has handled problems in the Secretary of State's office and, currently, the Division of Motor Vehicles.
Source:
Record #:
16821
Abstract:
Janice Faulkner had a distinguished career in higher education when Governor James B. Hunt called upon her to head the NC Division of Motor Vehicles, which was rocked with scandal and burdened with inefficiencies. She had also served as Secretary of Revenue and Secretary of State, the first woman to hold that position.
Full Text:
Record #:
35772
Abstract:
The former ECU English faculty member educated readers on the origins of pig picking, a dining tradition she declared was a socio-economic equalizer. As Faulkner disclosed, North Carolina can almost claim authorship of this tradition. Authorship can be claimed as far as the tradition starting in the South. The dividing line—the Mason-Dixon line, that is—can be found far north of it, with this Southern tradition having caught on in at least one town in Pennsylvania.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 5, Sept 1979, p47-48
Record #:
35869
Abstract:
Faulkner shared her version of childhood summer vacations from school, a rural Martin County experience markedly different from how many children today experience that three month break. From her reflection, she asserted that the children of yesteryear knew vacations as they were meant to be.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p10
Record #:
35852
Abstract:
Creativity can be defined in at least two ways, one related to artistic expression, the other devising a new use for an existing item. Faulkner’s discovery of how paper-based have evolved in terms of purpose includes how fans became used in a courting ritual taking place at church.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p10
Record #:
36104
Abstract:
The gallery in Joyner Library honored Faulkner’s contributions in academia at her alma mater, as well as politics at the local and state levels. Purposes perhaps more down to earth reflected Faulkner’s belief that students need what she called a “nest,” a place that helped campus to feel more like home.