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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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13 results for Utilities
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Record #:
11067
Abstract:
Carl Horn, Jr. is president of Duke Power Company, the country's 16th largest investor owned public utility. Horn is featured in this month's WE THE PEOPLE MAGAZINE's North Carolina Businessman in the News.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 29 Issue 8, Aug 1971, p13-15, 44, por
Record #:
11308
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Abstract:
In the 1960s, Duke Power Company, Virginia Electric and Power Company, and Carolina Power & Light constructed several dams along major waterways to generate energy. The dams were built at Lake Norman, and on the Neuse and Roanoke rivers. The power companies intend to develop enough power to outfit future increases in population consumption throughout the state. In addition, plans call for the construction of future nuclear plants by 1969 to help decrease production cost of power per kilowatt.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 33 Issue 17, Feb 1966, p10-11, il
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Record #:
12170
Abstract:
Carolina Power & Light Company began operations in 1908. Few individuals at that time could foresee that the small Raleigh-based utility would eventually provide electric service to over three million people in North and South Carolina.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 41 Issue 7, July 1983, p46-48, 57-58, il, por
Record #:
12608
Abstract:
Louis V. Sutton is an initial member of the NORTH CAROLINA magazine Business Hall of Fame. He spent a lifetime working in electric utilities and as president of Carolina Power and Light Company (CP&L) was recognized nationally by fellow power company presidents.
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Record #:
12856
Abstract:
The Public Service Company of North Carolina, Inc., a natural gas utility headquartered in Gastonia in Gaston County, is marking its fiftieth year of operation. Charles Branson Zeigler founded the company in the 1930s and went on to create a statewide natural gas distribution network.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 46 Issue 6, June 1988, p24, 26, 28, 50-51, il
Record #:
12987
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Abstract:
Lancaster examines the current status and future plans of the major electric companies in North Carolina.
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Record #:
15804
Abstract:
Rising electric rates have encouraged exploration of more efficient and equitable pricing mechanisms by the North Carolina Utilities commission. Alternatives include a peak load or time of day pricing scheme.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Winter 1977, p16-22, f
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Record #:
19931
Abstract:
This article provides an illustrated guide to the types of electric utilities that serve North Carolina. They are investor-owned utilities, electric cooperatives, and publicly-owned utilities. A map locates the utility service areas.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 45 Issue 5, May 2013, p10-11, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
20714
Abstract:
The Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard (REPS), signed into law in 1997, sets standards and a schedule that electricity providers follow to add renewable energy to the resources they use to produce electricity. This article discusses the law and various strategies cooperatives are using to increase use of renewable resources.
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Record #:
27749
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The third part in a three-part series about Aqua North Carolina. Explored is the Acquisitions Incentive Account (AIA) mechanism which allows Aqua NC to purchase troubled water systems. This rarely used mechanism has seen Aqua NC raise its rates for customers state-wide in NC even if they purchase a troubled water system and customers are not in that system. The AIA is seen as a special deal by critics and the rate increases have outraged citizens using the private utilities system.
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Record #:
29650
Abstract:
In North Carolina, the utilities industry is lifeblood for the state's economy. Energy companies are fundamental and the total revenues reported by state power companies reached $9.6 billion.
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NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 1, Jan 2008, p20-22, por
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Record #:
32659
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Public Service Company of North Carolina, Inc., is diversifying and restructuring its operations into five new subsidiaries. The subsidiaries will focus on natural resources, energy, natural gas and oil exploration, and propane production. Public Service is expecting continued rapid growth of its utility operations and is making plants to accommodate that growth.
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Record #:
35872
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The title wasn’t an allusion to Theodore Dreiser’s novel, but solar power, lately harnessed by suburbanites. Among them were the Adamczyks and Jones, who have discovered the virtues of this alternative fuel source. Virtues highlighted: saving the environment and on one’s utility bill.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p18-19