NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


20 results for Duke Power Co. (Durham)
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 2
Next
Record #:
602
Author(s):
Abstract:
Duke Power Company is the country's seventh largest investor-owned public utility.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 48 Issue 3, Mar 1990, p20-21, il
Record #:
2125
Author(s):
Abstract:
Deregulation of the utilities industry is challenging Duke Power and CP&L to provide earnings while facing competition from other power sources, rate-shopping by local industries, and services offered by out-of-state companies.
Source:
Record #:
2163
Author(s):
Abstract:
In an era of increased competition and relatively slow growth, Duke Power's CEO William H. Grigg is guiding the company into new areas such as power development in Latin America and the Pacific Rim, world-wide engineering services, and Duke Net.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 53 Issue 2, Feb 1995, p8-11, il
Record #:
5795
Author(s):
Abstract:
Eleven years ago Ruth Shaw resigned her job as president of Central Carolina Community College, the state's largest community college. She joined Duke Power, North Carolina's largest utility, as vice president of communications. In 2002, she became president of the company.
Record #:
10879
Abstract:
William Bulgin McGuire, president of Duke Power Company, is featured in this month's We The People Magazine's North Carolina Businessman in the News.
Source:
Record #:
11067
Abstract:
Carl Horn, Jr. is president of Duke Power Company, the country's 16th largest investor owned public utility. Horn is featured in this month's WE THE PEOPLE MAGAZINE's North Carolina Businessman in the News.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 29 Issue 8, Aug 1971, p13-15, 44, por
Record #:
14984
Author(s):
Abstract:
William States Lee was a pioneer in harnessing water power to generate electricity. His genius coupled with the money of James B. Duke created the Southern Power Company, later to be called the Duke Power Company. Lee connected electricity sources with customers using the then new transmission wires and soon companies switched from steam to electricity.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 1, June 1941, p15, 30
Full Text:
Record #:
18585
Abstract:
Duke Power Company, the country's seventh largest investor-owned public utility, provides electricity to a 20,000 square-mile services area in the Carolinas with a population of more than 4.5 million people.
Source:
Record #:
24314
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bill Grigg served as CEO of Duke Power Co. and closed a 7.7 billion dollar merger with PanEnergy Corp. that brought the struggling company into a whole new light. Duke's market will now stretch coast to coast.
Record #:
24351
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bill Lee, CEO of Duke Power Co. discusses his upbringing and how he has managed the company over the years.
Record #:
25372
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ruth Shaw is the first female president of Duke Power. She began her career as a teaching administrator, but her strong personality and ability to communicate got her into the corporate world.
Record #:
9455
Abstract:
In this continuing series of lesser known fishes of North Carolina, Lee describes the sculpin. Since this fish requires cool, swift moving creeks and streams, its range is limited to the state's mountain counties. Only two freshwater species live in the state--the mottled sculpin and the banded sculpin. These fish average only two inches in length and have no scales.
Full Text:
Record #:
29461
Author(s):
Abstract:
Duke Power set a goal last year to reduce its solid and hazardous wastes through a system of stock incentives. The company has trimmed 16,000 tons of waste or 177% of its goal.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 50 Issue 5, May 1992, p31-32, por
Record #:
30842
Author(s):
Abstract:
The largest power generating unit in the Southeast is being constructed by the Duke Power Company on the Catawba River near Belmont, North Carolina. Costing $33 million, the turbo-generators will provide a capacity of 625,000 kilowatts, five units combining for a total capacity of 1 million kilowatts. The voltage will be transformed and delivered to homes and businesses.
Source:
Record #:
30972
Author(s):
Abstract:
The average residential customer of Duke Power Company used more than 40 percent more electricity in 1959 than customers across the nation. Duke, a leading power system in the United States, increased its 12.5 billion killowatt hour product in 1958 to 13.8 billion in 1959. But despite major construction and additional services, rates have been reduced to make the advantages of electrical service available to all.