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29 results for "Buncombe County--History"
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Record #:
24093
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Abstract:
Asheville's Pack Square is a treasure trove of architectural styles but the Jackson building draws the most gazes. Lynwood B. Jackson commissioned the building in the 1920s in order to create an icon with which to advertise his business ventures.
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Record #:
24097
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Hearn's Cycling and Fitness is a popular store for bicycling equipment and a meetup for cycling enthusiasts. Opened in 1896, the store is the oldest business in Asheville and the oldest continuously-run bicycle shop in the nation.
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Record #:
24105
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The author discusses white water rafting in Asheville and talks about the history of French Broad Rafting Expeditions, the oldest rafting company in the area.
Record #:
24102
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The author discusses the history of opera houses in America and the opening of Asheville's Grand Opera House in 1890.
Record #:
24112
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The author discusses the history of fire trucks in Asheville, from horse drawn apparatuses to the trucks we see today.
Record #:
24130
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During the twentieth century, open-air farmers markets contributed the Asheville's development. The most prominent of the markets spread along South Lexington Avenue between Walnut Street and Broadway. Today, Asheville's Urban Trail celebrates the history of the market with pieces of art commemorating the importance of this place in Asheville's growth.
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Record #:
24611
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During World War II, David Finley, the first director of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. needed a sanctuary for the fine art in the gallery. Finley turned to his friend Edith Vanderbilt, who willingly agreed to hide these rare pieces of art at the Biltmore Estate. Painstaking effort ensured that the pieces were hidden and stored in a room with steel vaulted doors and steel barred windows. Some pieces kept at the Biltmore included Gilbert Stuart’s portrait of George Washington, Raphael’s Portrait of Bindo Altoviti, and Titian’s Venus with a Mirror.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 5, October 2014, p40-42, 44, 46-47, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
24709
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The author discusses the various ways both city dwellers and urbanites have joined together to create a program to develop the Buncombe County agriculturally. The community works together to help agriculture make a slow but steady comeback.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 36, February 1952, p12-12, 17, il
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Record #:
26923
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Joseph M. Gazzam built the Kenilworth Inn in 1890, following a tourist boom in Asheville due to the completion of the Western North Carolina Railroad 10 years prior. The hotel featured a number of amenities and had a prime location overlooking the Swannanoa River. Unfortunately, in April 1909, the hotel burnt to the ground, but in 1923, it was rebuilt and reopened as a resort hotel.
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Record #:
26926
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The building that once housed Asheville’s former Plonk School of the Creative Arts was built in 1925 and originally served as the headquarters of the Asheville Women’s Club. In 1941, the building became home to the Plonk School until 1964 when the school closed its doors. The building is now being divided into single family dwellings, but the exterior will still reflect the building’s history.
Record #:
27278
Author(s):
Abstract:
Two buildings in Asheville’s downtown were affectionately called “Asheville’s Odd Couple” during the mid-twentieth century. Both built in 1924, the Westall Building and the Jackson Building have different architectural styles, Gothic Revival and English Norman combined with Spanish Romanesque, respectively.
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Record #:
27818
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Biltmore Estate Industries began in the late nineteenth century with an instructional woodworking class taught by Charlotte Yale and Eleanor Vance, and supported by Edith Vanderbilt. In the early 20th century, Yale and Vance expanded the reach of these classes to teach mountain women how to produce finer wool fabric. Biltmore Estate Industries demonstrated how popular and viable commercial weaving could be for the Asheville area. Following George Vanderbilt’s death, ownership changed hands and the material produced by the women came to be known as Biltmore Homespun. Today, the industry is owned and operated by the Blomberg family who purchased it in the 1950s.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 10, March 2017, p30, 32, 34, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
22706
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Abstract:
In the Appalachia Region of North Carolina, views on the secession from the United States at the start of the American Civil War were varied. For Watauga and Buncombe counties, culture and geography played a role in which side a community supported. Patterns in enlistment show that the higher elevations were more likely to be Unionists because of their disconnect with the slave economy.
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Record #:
36454
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Abstract:
Western North Carolina played an important role in the state’s economic and occupational development, through its railroads delivering raw materials such as lumber and mica across the state. Pictorial evidence Western Carolina University preserves includes the accompanying photo of the Great Smoky Mountain Railroad. Through such endeavors, acknowledgment of railroads’ place in North Carolina history chugging along.