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8 results for Museums--Asheville
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Record #:
8262
Abstract:
The Southern Appalachian Radio Museum is one of the state's smaller museums. It occupies a room in the Elm Building on the campus of the Asheville-Buncombe Technical Community College. Volunteers discuss with visitors the assortment of transmitters, receivers, converters, code keys, ham radios, and other vintage items from the history of radio.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 6, Nov 2006, p146-148, 150, 152, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8423
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Abstract:
The Homespun Museum was recently opened on the Biltmore Estate in Asheville. The museum focuses on Biltmore Industries, which was founded in 1901 by Mrs. George Vanderbilt. She organized the business to produce traditional handmade mountain crafts and to provide employment for those living on the estate. Mrs. Vanderbilt sold Biltmore Industries to Fred Seely in 1917. Seely moved the company to his Grove Park Inn in Asheville. Seely's firm produced high-quality, hand-spun woolens that were worn by three different First Families: the Coolidges, the Hoovers, and the Roosevelts. In addition to its display on Biltmore Industries, the Homespun Museum exhibits other mountain arts, such as Cherokee Indian crafts, mountain baskets, Appalachian folk art, blown glass and pottery.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 12, May 1985, p22-23, il
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Record #:
10630
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Abstract:
The only Health Museum in North Carolina was opened in Asheville in 1969 by a small organization of doctor's wives headed by Mrs. Eugene Sharpe, President of the Auxiliary to the Buncombe County Medical Society. Realizing the invaluable help that their own children received from their fathers' knowledge, libraries, and access to source materials, the Society decided to make these aids available to other children in the county.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 38 Issue 11, Nov 1970, p25
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Record #:
10749
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The Black Mountain College Museum, located in Asheville, honors a unique institution that lasted only twenty-four years but is remembered as an innovative experiment in higher education. Established in 1933, the college never had an enrollment of over one hundred even in the best of years, yet fifty years later, its faculty and student body reads like a who's who of cultural visionaries.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 76 Issue 9, Feb 2009, p118-120, 122, 124, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
24019
Abstract:
T.C. and Brandy DiBella have opened Asheville Pinball Museum in Asheville as an interactive museum and store. The museum is full of history, trivia, and fun for the residents of the area.
Record #:
24092
Abstract:
The Estes-Winn Antique Car Museum is housed in a building that used to be used for the production of fabric. Now, Asheville locals can visit the Museum to examine restored cars from early-to-late 20th century.
Record #:
36579
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A house restored to its former glory has been home in many ways since its construction by Peter Demens, co-founder of St. Petersburg, Florida. Illustrations of its illustrious history: stop-off in the social scene of the 1890s and 1910s; site for the Ida Jolly Crawley Museum of Art and Archaeology, Asheville’s first public museum.
Record #:
36573
Author(s):
Abstract:
Newfound School’s curriculum, resulting in a majority of its graduates attending schools such as Yale and Oberlin, was partly inspired by the decade it existed. While complying with the state’s educational standards, the school founded in 1971 added real-world experience in novel ways. Included were courses such as oceanography; town hall-style to discuss current events; students exploring the city during free periods.