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15 results for Tar Heel Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980
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Record #:
6557
Abstract:
In 1965, a group called the Historic Hope Foundation set out to save an abandoned house in Bertie County called Hope. The house had been built by David Stone, who was very active in state politics. He had been a member of the General Assembly, superior court judge, a member of the U.S. House of Representatives, a U.S. Senator, and in 1808, governor of North Carolina. Within a year enough money had been raised to buy the house and eighteen acres of land. Restoration of the property began immediately. By 1972, Hope Plantation had been entered on the Register of Historic Places and opened to the public.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p36-38, il
Record #:
6558
Author(s):
Abstract:
Terra Ceia, which means “heavenly earth,” is located near Washington, N.C. The community originated in the 1920s, when a New York investment company recruited thirty-five Dutch families to settle there and develop the area as farmland. Stanley traces the history of the community, emphasizing its prominence in the tulip growing business.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p40-41, il
Record #:
6559
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fort Defiance, the Caldwell County home of Revolutionary War General William Lenoir, takes its name from a local frontier fort of the late 1700s. In 1965, the Lenoir family sold the home and all its furnishings to the Caldwell County Historical Society. Now a local historic site, the home has been restored to its 1792 appearance.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p63-64, il, por
Record #:
6555
Abstract:
Duke Forest consists of 8,500 acres and is a delight to naturalists, hikers, and research personnel. The forest is bounded by Durham, Chapel Hill, and Hillsborough. Muse discusses the forest from its beginning in the 1920s under Clarence Korstian, the first dean of the Duke Forestry School, to its present use for research and recreation.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p30-31, il
Record #:
6556
Author(s):
Abstract:
Moore County has North Carolina's first county-wide biking route. Ahearn describes the 100-mile route, which has four free campsites with water and toilet facilities, lists of available places to stop for food, and route markers which point out the major attractions along the way.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p32-33, map
Record #:
35854
Author(s):
Abstract:
Trips along the Unwharrie Trail involved factors common to hiking: familiarity with the terrain, sufficient supplies of water, and trails well-constructed and maintained. Highlighting the uniqueness of the Uwharrie Trail experience were completion time, campsites number, and parking possibilities. For expert insights into the Uwharrie experience, the author offered Joe Moffitt’s An Afternoon Hike into the Past, “a must for campfire reading along the Trail.”
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p22-23
Record #:
35858
Author(s):
Abstract:
The lure of the river also known as the Lumbee has inspired a litany of written works in the past century. They ranged from a poem by John Charles McNeill to Robesonian Historical Edition, from William Haynes’ Outing and Field and Stream articles to Hall’s Wilmington Gazette.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p48-49
Record #:
35861
Author(s):
Abstract:
This mountain range, known for possessing the two highest peaks and occasional wind speeds of over one hundred mph, had purported purposes ranging from the practical to peculiar. Speculations included worship sites for Native American tribes and command and observation posts for the military.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p65
Record #:
35853
Author(s):
Abstract:
Railroading in this case involved Pullman cars. Riding the rails the fashioned way was still possible through the National Railroad Historic Society and smaller model railroad groups. Highlighting the difference of the train experience not by Amtrak were factors involved with steam and coal power locomotives. Illustrating the uniqueness also was a description of a trip starting in Roanoke and ending in Greensboro.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p17-19
Record #:
35856
Author(s):
Abstract:
Experiencing seasons Tar Heel State style and NC from the Crystal Coast to the Mountains was possible through a visit to Gastonia’s Schiele’s Museum. Illuminating the enlightening experience: information about the museum’s murals and slide shows describing the natural history and ecology of NC’s three regions.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p28-29
Record #:
35859
Abstract:
Cherokee referred to a Highlands town and people residing on its reservation. Information about this Native American tribe could be discovered in a guided tour of Oconaluftee Village and places such as a wax museum. Artistic expressions of information inspired by the area’s mythical origins included Little People and This Haunted Land.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p54-56
Record #:
35852
Abstract:
Creativity can be defined in at least two ways, one related to artistic expression, the other devising a new use for an existing item. Faulkner’s discovery of how paper-based have evolved in terms of purpose includes how fans became used in a courting ritual taking place at church.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p10
Record #:
35855
Author(s):
Abstract:
Five decades before the famous Gold Rush in California, there was a discovery of this precious metal in Cabarrus County by a farmer, John Reed. Gold Fever can still be experienced in mines like the Cotton Patch in New London and Reed Mine near Concord.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p25-26
Record #:
35860
Author(s):
Abstract:
For many towns in the Highlands, the past was within reach. Inns making times distant tangible included Green Park, modeled after the classic mountain hostel; Snowbird Mountain, with a proximity to Joyce Kilmer Forest; and High Hampton, whose land was once part of Civil War general Wade Hampton’s estate. Other lodgings offering an experience not to be found in history books, they included Eseeola Lodge, on the National Register of Historic Places; the Weld House, with boarding house origins; and Appalachian Inn, offering home-grown meals and a bell summoning guests to dinner.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p58-60
Record #:
35857
Author(s):
Abstract:
What made Ocracoke unique from many other NC towns was heard in an accent betraying the area’s English roots. As for what could be seen, they were reasonably priced accommodations for visitors and friendliness of people descended from the original dozen families.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p43-45