NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


13 results for Forests and forestry
Currently viewing results 1 - 13
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
905
Author(s):
Abstract:
The entire issue deals with forestry and the forest products industry of North Carolina.
Source:
North Carolina State Economist (NoCar HD 1401 T34), Vol. Issue , Dec 1992, p1-4, bibl, f
Subject(s):
Record #:
6555
Abstract:
Duke Forest consists of 8,500 acres and is a delight to naturalists, hikers, and research personnel. The forest is bounded by Durham, Chapel Hill, and Hillsborough. Muse discusses the forest from its beginning in the 1920s under Clarence Korstian, the first dean of the Duke Forestry School, to its present use for research and recreation.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p30-31, il
Record #:
10323
Author(s):
Abstract:
Forests are the state's greatest undeveloped and neglected resource. Preston discusses the present condition of the state's forests, unproductive woodlands, and the importance of forests to the state's economy.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 15 Issue 6, Nov 1957, p18, 20, 105, il, map
Subject(s):
Record #:
13319
Author(s):
Abstract:
November 26 through the 28, 1908, marks the first Forest Fair held in the United States. Eighty-five foresters, forestry students, state commissioners of forestry, statesmen, botanists, lumbermen, and newspapermen from the United States, Canada, and England, gathered on the grounds of the Biltmore Estate to discuss forestry and forestry experiments.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 14, Dec 1954, p12-13, il
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
26432
Author(s):
Abstract:
Woodlands provide both food and protection for many wildlife species, and often wooded areas benefit from controlled cutting and replanting. A cooperative project between NCWRC and the NC Division of Forest Resources has helped determine methods of effective clear cutting and planting.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 24 Issue (27) 3, Mar 1980, p2, 15
Subject(s):
Record #:
2205
Author(s):
Abstract:
Most of the state's bottomland hardwood forests are found in the Coastal Plain along broad river flood plains. Because the forest exists in a flooding environment, the plants and animals there must adapt to the fluctuating water levels or perish.
Full Text:
Record #:
3885
Author(s):
Abstract:
Carl Schenck, manager of the Biltmore Forest, founded the nation's first forestry school in 1898. The Biltmore Forest School opened the country to the concept of forest management. Today, such new ideas as seeing forests as sustainable and as part of a larger landscape guide forestry management.
Full Text:
Record #:
16813
Author(s):
Abstract:
When Lee's grandfather Julian Weatherbee died in the mid-1970s, he inherited his old rolltop desk. His grandfather had attended the Biltmore Forest School in 1908 and spent most of his career as a forester in the state of Washington. Inside the desk Lee found a treasure trove of his grandfather's material from the school--class and field notebooks, information about birds and wildlife, drawings, and mathematical calculations which provided him a view of life at the forestry school.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
28264
Abstract:
Terrestrial salamanders are vulnerable to changes in the forest-floor microclimate as a result of canopy thinning by the hemlock woolly adelgid. A study conducted in the Highlands of Macon County, North Carolina concluded that as long as leaf litter remained moist and intact, the long-term impact of canopy thinning will likely be minimal.
Record #:
28677
Author(s):
Abstract:
A photoessay survey’s the state’s old-growth forests from the mountains to the sea. Photographs of the forests and trees provide a look at what North Carolina looked like before it was settled. Photos of Eastern hemlocks, live oaks, American holly, bald cypress, longleaf pine, Fraser magnolia, chestnut oaks, and tulip poplars are pictured.
Record #:
29189
Author(s):
Abstract:
At North Carolina’s three Small State Forests, visitors can talk to trees by pressing a button. The specially-marked trees play recordings which describe the tree’s ecology, its history, and its use. The Small State Forests were developed to teach the public about forests and how to better care for their land.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p14-15, il, por
Record #:
31321
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's forests constitute one of its major environmental resources. Many of the best known industries in the state rely on products made from wood from the 20 million acres of state woodland. Forty-five percent of all manufacturing plants in the state utilize the fast forest products and account for an annual payroll in excess of $270 million.
Record #:
34716
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina hosts approximately 31 National Champion trees listed on the Big Tree Program. Species include the longleaf pine, water oak, flowering dogwood, bald cypress, and silky camellia. Also detailed is the process of finding these champion trees and how two men have added significantly to the list.
Full Text: