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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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247 results for "The North Carolina Booklet"
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Record #:
22563
Abstract:
During the reign of King William the Third, expenses incurred in the passage to America could be partially paid for every Church of England missionary or school-master who would undertake the journey. One such missionary was Reverend Thomas Burges, who made his way, via Virginia, to North Carolina in 1760. Burges settled in the Edgecomb Parish, Halifax County, North Carolina, where he taught school as well as worked in the ministry until his death in 1779. His eldest son from his first marriage, Henry John Burges, born in 1744, followed his father's example and became ordained in England in 1768. Leaving North Carolina for Virginia in 1770, Burges became a well-known supporter of the American Revolution while continuing to preach.
Record #:
22561
Abstract:
An iron marker now sits at the site of the Confederate Navy Yard in Charlotte, North Carolina. The Navy Yard operated from spring of 1862 until 1865. Commanded by first by General R.L. Page and later by H. Ashton Ramsay, a number of large structures were erected on site, including a gun carriage shop, a laboratory, a torpedo shop, a forge where propeller shafting was forged for all the Confederate ironclads. Rifles, shot, shells, and torpedoes were also manufactured at the Navy Yard in Charlotte.
Record #:
22562
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although few early written accounts of Indians in the Piedmont region of North Carolina exist, there are traces of the native populations that have been left behind. The Saponi, Tutelo, and especially the Catawba were strong tribes in the Piedmont region, as seen through relics and remains such as stone implements, pottery, arrows, and even graves.
Record #:
22560
Author(s):
Abstract:
The turning point in the struggle of American independence came in the winter of 1777-1778. Clothing, food, and munitions supplies were scant and the British fleet and army held Philadelphia, New York, and the Hudson River. North Carolina had nine regiments in Washington's winter camp, and part of these men were assigned to harass the British outposts.
Record #:
22559
Author(s):
Abstract:
Under the roof of Mrs. Elizabeth King in Edenton, North Carolina, on October 25th, 1774, fifty-one patriotic ladies declared they would not drink English tea or wear anything manufactured in England until the taxes were repealed for the American colonies.
Record #:
22553
Author(s):
Abstract:
Women during the colonial period in North Carolina were expected to work. They were faced with many tasks and difficulties on a daily basis including spinning and candle making. The journals of two women from colonial North Carolina show what daily life was like.
Record #:
22556
Abstract:
There have been four Grand Masters of the Grand Lodge, St. John's Lodge with Grand Jurisdiction of North Carolina. From 1791 to 1811, John Louis Taylor served as Grand Master for three terms, later attaining fame as a lawyer and Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. Following Richard Dobbs Spaight's retirement in 1832, it was not until 1850 that Alonzo T. Jerkins, prominently connected in industry, finance, and transportation, became Grand Master. Following Jerkins three consecutive terms as Grand Master, Charles Cauthen Clark, a native of New Bern and member of Congress, was elected Grand Master in 1870.
Record #:
22555
Abstract:
Poised to be removed for a more modern structure, an old home on the corner of Main and Market Streets in Washington, North Carolina was built in 1778 for John Gray Blount. Blount, born in 1752, was a Revolutionary War patriot and served in special missions on behalf of the Revolutionary Government. With a successful import and export trade, Blount became an early commissioner of the town of Washington and was instrumental in getting the county seat transferred there from Bath.
Record #:
22552
Author(s):
Abstract:
Formed along side the colonial precincts, parishes became the religious divisions of North Carolina from 1715 to 1778. An Act in 1715 created nine parishes and encompassed all the leading men in the province as parish councilmen; this was amended in 1741 to include 16 parishes, and again in 1751 when vestrymen were to be elected. The number of parishes continued to grow as North Carolina grew as a colony. However, the whole system was abolished in 1778 although some continued to function into the early nineteenth century.
Record #:
22554
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although mentioned little by historians, Henry McCullough was a champion for Scotch-Irish Presbyterians in North Carolina, who came from Ireland to escape religious persecution. McCullough secured land grants for settlement, covering a large part of the sand hills and Piedmont region of North Carolina, and named it Duplin.
Record #:
22551
Author(s):
Abstract:
It is argued that the term 'Pickett's Charge,' referring to the movements of General George Pickett during the Battle of Gettysburg during the American Civil War, is actually a misnomer. As Pickett only commanded 3 brigades and 15 regiments, the phrase should give attention to General Longstreet, whose command led the charge according to official reports.
Record #:
22557
Author(s):
Abstract:
Centre Hill, Chowan County, North Caroilna, is the highest point in the county, forming a large watershed. This well-defined area became a civic and communal center in the area's history, attracting itinerant Methodist ministers, flourishing schools, and Civil War incidents.
Record #:
22558
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1850 a charter was granted to form the Carolina Female College, which was built in Ansonville, North Carolina. With the power to confer diplomas, Carolina Female College was the third institution in the Untied States dedicated solely to the education of women. Under patronage from the Methodist Episcopal Church, Carolina Female College drew large numbers from various southern states.
Record #:
22550
Author(s):
Abstract:
William Ruffin Cox, born in 1832, became a lawyer in Tennessee in 1857, after which he married and moved to North Carolina. Upon the outbreak of the American Civil War, Cox was immediately appointed Major of the Second North Carolina troops, where he became renowned for his endurance and participation in some of the most famous battle of the war, also coming to the aid of General Lee. After the Civil War, Cox served North Carolina in reconstruction as a lawyer and elected official, later being elected as Secretary of the Senate of the United States.
Record #:
22547
Author(s):
Abstract:
In Iredell County, North Carolina stands old Fort Dobbs, a place of refuge for early settlers against native hostilities. Named after Governor Arthur Dobbs who persuaded the General Assembly to provide money for defense of the western frontier, Fort Dobbs was increasingly used for protection against violent raids.