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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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7 results for Dillard, Richard
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Record #:
21971
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This article examines the construction of Hayes Plantation in Edenton by Governor Samuel Johnston in 1801, with attention placed on Johnston's history, background, and the steps he took in building the city.
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Record #:
21964
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An account of the events that came to be known as the 'Edenton Tea-Party,' the resolution of protest against tax on tea drafted by fifty-one ladies of Edenton. Particular attention is given correcting misinformation and myth that the author feels permeated the popular account of the events at the time.
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Record #:
22080
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A history of Edenton, North Carolina with a focus on the establishment and development of St. Paul's Church, clergy, and congregation.
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Record #:
22117
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This article examines the various Indian tribes of Eastern North Carolina and their interactions with each other and early English colonists. The article also provides additional information regarding the Tuscarora War and how the Indian tribes were affected by its outcome.
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Record #:
22298
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Several North Carolina women who played parts in various phases of the Revolutionary War including Betsy Dowdy, Mary Slocumb, and Flora MacDonald.
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Record #:
22557
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Centre Hill, Chowan County, North Caroilna, is the highest point in the county, forming a large watershed. This well-defined area became a civic and communal center in the area's history, attracting itinerant Methodist ministers, flourishing schools, and Civil War incidents.
Record #:
22559
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Under the roof of Mrs. Elizabeth King in Edenton, North Carolina, on October 25th, 1774, fifty-one patriotic ladies declared they would not drink English tea or wear anything manufactured in England until the taxes were repealed for the American colonies.