NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


14 results for Washington (N.C.)--History
Currently viewing results 1 - 14
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
79
Abstract:
Phelps recreates the community of Washington's reaction as the U.S. entered World War II in 1941.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 7, Dec 1991, p16-17, il
Full Text:
Record #:
2628
Author(s):
Abstract:
Schooners figured prominently in the state's water commerce during the 18th and 19th Centuries. Records of the S. R. Fowle Company of Washington provide important information on the use of these vessels for commerce.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 5, Oct 1995, p22-27, il, f
Record #:
9243
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although home to a number of political figures, Washington also has a history of celebrities. Cecil B. and William B. DeMille both hail from this town, and author of the book SHOW BOAT, Edna Ferber, was inspired by the Washington show boat.\r\n
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 6, Nov 1979, p18-20, il, por
Full Text:
Record #:
19577
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Potts-Burgaw-Duke house has finally concluded its 23 year restoration to return the house to the affluence and grandeur it enjoyed when it was constructed in 1870. Built by bachelor lawyer Samuel Potts, it was then purchased by Judge Burgaw, who in turn sold it to Dr. Duke and his family. By the 1980s, the home was deteriorating rapidly and finally purchased by Don Stroud, who spent 23 years restoring the house to a level of splendor not seen since the late 19th century.
Full Text:
Record #:
23852
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and the Norfolk Southern Railway became important parts of Beaufort County's and specifically the town of Washington's economic system in the late nineteenth century.
Full Text:
Record #:
24468
Author(s):
Abstract:
Washington, North Carolina is a picturesque waterfront town that is popular for its friendliness and summer festivals. A brief history of the town is presented here, along with historic photos of some of the most famous buildings.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 2, July 1991, p28-31, il
Full Text:
Record #:
22555
Abstract:
Poised to be removed for a more modern structure, an old home on the corner of Main and Market Streets in Washington, North Carolina was built in 1778 for John Gray Blount. Blount, born in 1752, was a Revolutionary War patriot and served in special missions on behalf of the Revolutionary Government. With a successful import and export trade, Blount became an early commissioner of the town of Washington and was instrumental in getting the county seat transferred there from Bath.
Record #:
23024
Author(s):
Abstract:
A monumental series of track activities began in 1925 between high schools from Greenville and Washington. A relay race was held on a 23 mile route between the Pitt County Court House and the Beaufort County Court House which required about 92 runners. Thousands of spectators lined the route for several years until increased traffic and safety problems moved the event to the Pitt County Fair Grounds. About 1938/39 the first track team at the Greenville High School was established, which later developed into competitive high school track in 1961.
Record #:
28784
Abstract:
A photojournal explores the history of Washington, NC through its architecture, landmarks, and notable artifacts. The Civil War bell at the First Presbyterian church, the Buckman’s Department Store Elevator, the Vaudeville Theater at Turnage Theatre, and the Old Courthouse are a few of the items and places highlighted for their history.
Record #:
36149
Abstract:
A former vaudeville theater located upstairs in Washington's Turnage Theater may be one of the best of its kind still in existence according Emily Rebert, the City of Washington's community development planner and also master's candidate at Savannah College of Art and Design. It is hoped Rebert's work will lead to funding opportunities for restoration.
Record #:
36167
Abstract:
The connection between a well known area of the Outer Banks and Beaufort County's capital was created physically. For many decades, ferries like the Bessie Virginia transported good between “Little Washington” and area known for its connection to Roanoke’s lost colony. It was also created emotionally, in the bonds between people interdependent on each other for survival.
Record #:
36168
Author(s):
Abstract:
Returning to her birthplace entailed coming back to a place that still felt like home. Helping to make it her hometown was familiar haunts like the long standing Bill’s Hot Dogs.
Record #:
37419
Author(s):
Abstract:
History of towns all over North Carolina giving their former names; for example: Washington, NC was formerly known as ‘Peatown’ and then ‘Archdale.’