NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


11 results for Voss, Mike
Currently viewing results 1 - 11
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
19549
Author(s):
Abstract:
The history of Washington has long attracted visitors and now is boosted by the stories of ghosts that inhabit the town. Ghost walks are becoming more and more common as they amuse and scare visitors with spooky stories, such as the story of 3-year-old Carrie Foreman, who passed in 1887 and still haunts the town.
Full Text:
Record #:
19558
Author(s):
Abstract:
The ferry crews on the Bayview-Aurora ferry route consider passenger safety their number one priority during a passage. Even while dealing with safety, security, and ferry maintenance, they still find time to enjoy the little things like the beautiful North Carolina sunset.
Full Text:
Record #:
19577
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Potts-Burgaw-Duke house has finally concluded its 23 year restoration to return the house to the affluence and grandeur it enjoyed when it was constructed in 1870. Built by bachelor lawyer Samuel Potts, it was then purchased by Judge Burgaw, who in turn sold it to Dr. Duke and his family. By the 1980s, the home was deteriorating rapidly and finally purchased by Don Stroud, who spent 23 years restoring the house to a level of splendor not seen since the late 19th century.
Full Text:
Record #:
19576
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1898, Washington, N.C. became one of the most technologically advanced fire departments in the state with its acquisition of a Silsby steam fire engine. This technological marvel was able to pumped between 500 and 600 gallons of water per minute and was used in its last fire in 1937. Today the Silsby sits on display in the front room of the current fire station, visible to those who travel by.
Full Text:
Record #:
19579
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 72-foot gaff-rigged schooner Jeanie B is a reminder of Washington's past as a prosperous port on the Pamlico River. Instead of transporting naval stores or agricultural products, Jeanie B now transports passengers on cruises of the Pamlico River, Pamlico Sound, and adjacent waterways. It also is used as a training vessel to teach the basics of sailing to young, aspiring sailors.
Full Text:
Record #:
21960
Author(s):
Abstract:
The husband-and-wife team of Bob Henkel and Karen Krupa opened the Inner Banks Artisans' Center in Washington in 2009. The center provides a venue for local artists. Currently, there are seventy-five artists represented at the center, which has eighteen studios on the ground floor.
Full Text:
Record #:
21961
Abstract:
Two bread and breakfasts where visitors can stay in Washington are the Moss House Bed and Breakfast and the Pamlico House Bed and Breakfast. Voss describes them with an emphasis what each serves for breakfast.
Full Text:
Record #:
21983
Abstract:
Diane Lee was raised on the river and used to crab with her father. When she took up pottery, it seemed natural to include crabs. Although some potters paint their designs on pots, Lee says she never mastered painting. She creates the crabs in 3-D, and they appear on dishes, pots, lampshades, and other functional items.
Full Text:
Record #:
21980
Abstract:
Don Stroud and Dee Congleton work with the Washington Area Historic Foundation seeking to insure that the city's historic buildings and places are preserved for future generations. They discuss some of the projects.
Full Text:
Record #:
21996
Abstract:
Arthur Williams of Washington is the new NC whole-hog barbecue champion. He competed against 29 of the state's best pig cookers at the state championship held in Raleigh on September 28-29, 2013. Williams is a former state legislator and has won a number of awards, including Washington's annual Smoke on the Water and the PirateFest for 2013 in Greenville. He is the head cook with the Trade Mart Traders barbecue team.
Source:
Record #:
21998
Abstract:
Blake and Emily Scott of Washington have been making award-winning wildlife films since 1992. They have filmed in many of the world's most beautiful places, but much of their work has been done at the wildlife refuges in Eastern North Carolina. The Scotts say they are not in the business for the awards, but rather \"to instill an appreciation for, and a respect of, wildlife in its natural habitat and what it means to protect that habitat so future generations can enjoy geese, black bears, and wolf pups in the wild.\"
Source:
Full Text: