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36 results for Reconstruction (1865-1877)--North Carolina
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Record #:
9942
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Abstract:
In 1868, former Raleigh newspaper editor William W. Holden was elected Governor of North Carolina. Following accounts of civil unrest in Alamance and Caswell counties, Holden declared martial law and delegated enforcement to Col. George W. Kirk, who raised a force of 670 men, took over the courthouses in Graham and Yanceyville, made himself military dictator of the two counties, and arrested more than 100 persons. Subsequent to the Kirk-Holden War, as it came to be known, Holden was impeached by the House of Representatives on charges of illegally arresting 105 citizens, recruiting soldiers illegally, and refusing to obey a writ of habeas corpus. Holden was convicted on six of eight charges and became the only North Carolina Governor to be removed from office by impeachment.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 40 Issue 16, Feb 1973, p11-12, il, por
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Record #:
12054
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Abstract:
During the lean, bitter years after the Civil War, many North Carolinians loyal to the Union cause filed claims with the United States Congress for damages. The three man board-of-commissioners set up to process the flood of damage claims from the South consisted of men from Vermont, New York, and Iowa. Of the 22,000 claims totaling $60 million, payments reached only $4 million dollars.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 5, Aug 1961, p7, 11, il
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Record #:
12650
Abstract:
Originating in Pulaski, Tennessee, the Ku Klux Klan infiltrated North Carolina in 1867. The first meeting, held in the law offices of Kerr Craige, initiated a movement that spread mainly across the Piedmont region of the state, expanding membership to some 40,000 individuals by 1872. Participants were required to be white males, aged eighteen or older, and be members of the Democratic Party.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 30 Issue 18, Feb 1963, p13-14, por
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Record #:
12667
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Abstract:
During the lean, bitter years after the Civil War, many North Carolinians loyal to the Union cause filed claims with the United States Congress for damages. The three man board-of-commissioners set up to process the flood of damage claims from the South consisted of men from Vermont, New York, and Iowa. Of the 22,000 claims totaling $60 million, payments reached only $4 million dollars.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 5, Aug 1961, p7, 11, il
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Record #:
13574
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Recounting the 1872 North Carolina Directory, Goerch discusses population growth and offers information regarding industry and government during Reconstruction. Included in this article is an 1871 illustration depicting a street scene in Raleigh.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 21, Oct 1952, p3-4, il
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Record #:
13695
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\"As you love your state, hold Robeson [County]!\" This is the most famous political battle cry of North Carolina and originated over conflicts stemming from electing delegates to the 1868 Constitutional Convention.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 26, Nov 1952, p22-24, map
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Record #:
15062
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Colonel Leonidas L. Polk was a great North Carolinians who rendered invaluable service along many lines. In the days of Reconstruction, Polk sponsored a provision for the establishment of a State Department of Agriculture. He also introduced the resolution providing a committee to consider the feasibility of establishing an institution for the higher education of women.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 19, Oct 1940, p11, 25, por
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Record #:
19895
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This article is another installment in a series focusing on correspondence between North Carolinians and national politicians during the tumultuous time of Reconstruction. These letters were sent to Carl Benjamin Franklin Butler, a member of the United States house of Representatives. The distinction of these papers is typical correspondence are not from the State's political leaders but rather the common citizen. Letters cover a period from January 1865 to April 1866. Â
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Record #:
19896
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Abstract:
This article is the continuation in a series focusing on correspondence between North Carolinians and national politicians during the tumultuous time of Reconstruction. These letters were sent to Carl Benjamin Franklin Butler, a member of the United States House of Representatives. The distinction of these papers is typical correspondence are not from the State's political leaders but rather the common citizen. Letters cover a period from March 1874 to November 1877.
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Record #:
19893
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This article is another installment in a series focusing on correspondence between North Carolinians and national politicians during the tumultuous time of Reconstruction. These letters were sent to Carl Schurz, head of the Liberal Republican movement. Letters cover a period from April 1865 to October 1878.
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Record #:
19905
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In this installment of letters addressing the concerns of North Carolina citizens to various public officials a number of different addressees include Chief Justice Salmon Portland Chase (January 13, 1808 - May 7, 1873), Senator Lyman Trumbull (October 12, 1813 - June 25, 1896), Representative Thaddeus Stevens (April 4, 1792 - August 11, 1868), and Senator Benjamin Franklin Wade (October 27, 1800 - March 2, 1878).
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Record #:
19902
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Republican and 20th president of the United States, James Abram Garfield's papers are housed at the Library of Congress. From these letters are correspondence from North Carolina citizens, politicians, and attorneys from across the state. As in the other installments, these notes concern the Reconstruction era and its impact on the state. Letters cover a period from April 1868 to October 1877.
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Record #:
19964
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Both President Lincoln and President Johnson proclaimed an act of amnesty for all persons who served the Confederacy during the war if they agreed to swear an oath of loyalty to the United States. The author examines the specific provisions President Johnson established in his plan to restore to North Carolina; a plan which was very favorable to the state because of North Carolinian's pro-Union supporters during the Civil War. The article also details Governor Holden's actions to fulfill the requirements of President Johnson's plan and how this affected former soldiers.
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Record #:
20125
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The author looks specifically at the administration of successive Salem College Presidents Maximilian Grunert, Theophilus Zorn, and Edward Rondthaler during the difficult Reconstruction era following the Civil War. Examining both the financial and social difficulties of the era, the article looks at how these three men managed to keep Salem College open during a period when other institutions closed.
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Record #:
20201
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North Carolina resident Richard Porson Paddison left the state as a young man and ventured North to find permanent employment. With the onset of the American Civil War, Paddison returned home to enlist in the Confederate army. After the conclusion of the war and at the beginning of Reconstruction, Paddison exchanged four letters with friends and family regarding his experiences in a rebuilding South. His letter offer an insight into Reconstruction from the perspective of the non-slave holding middle class.