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28 results for Water--Standards
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Record #:
34148
Author(s):
Abstract:
According to a special report to the Raleigh City Council, the recently enacted state ban on phosphate detergent has improved the phosphate-removal efficiency of the city’s Neuse River Wastewater Treatment Plant and has had an immediate positive impact on water quality in the Neuse River. Additional studies by environmental consultants also show improvements to the phosphate-removal efficiency of wastewater treatment facilities in Greensboro and Durham.
Record #:
34154
Author(s):
Abstract:
An ad hoc committee set up by the North Carolina Environmental Management Commission to review proposed state water quality standards has recommended that the Division of Environmental Management proceed with adoption of most of the new standards. Public hearings are scheduled in May and are the last step before regulations are finalized. The new standards pertain to water pollution, wastewater treatment, and municipal water supplies.
Record #:
34180
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Environmental Management Commission voted not to proceed to public hearings with a recommendation to weaken the state’s instream limit on dioxin. Dioxin is a by-product of chlorine bleaching which has caused cancer and reproductive abnormalities in laboratory animals. The vote came in response to a request by paper companies, which contend that new information indicates the cancer potency of dioxin is not as great as previously thought, and that they still cannot meet the effluent limitations the state standard imposes.
Record #:
34194
Author(s):
Abstract:
In a project sponsored by the North Carolina Urban Water Consortium, university investigators have concluded that the urban water utilities they studied may need to improve removal of disinfection by-products from drinking water to meet requirements of the Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments of 1986. They also conclude that requirements for removal of synthetic organic chemicals and volatile organic chemicals will probably not have a major impact on the utilities.
Record #:
34206
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Environmental Management Commission rejected a recommendation to hold public hearings on changing the state’s water quality standard for dioxin, a by-product of chlorine bleaching linked to cancer and reproductive abnormalities. Instead, the commission voted in July to return the dioxin issue to the Water Quality Committee for additional study.
Record #:
34306
Author(s):
Abstract:
In February 2000, the North Carolina Environmental Management Commission’s Groundwater Committee revisited a proposal to adopt a temporary rule lowering the groundwater standard for arsenic. The proposal addresses groundwater contaminants which could affect the quality of drinking water and impose health risks. Currently, private wells are not subject to drinking water standards or routinely tested for contamination.
Record #:
34316
Author(s):
Abstract:
In October, the North Carolina Environmental Management Commission voted to adopt a recommended decision by an Administrative Law Judge who ruled that the Department of Environment and Natural Resources had erroneously interpreted the state’s turbidity rule in a manner that allows water quality standards to be violated so long as sediment control BMPs are being followed. The decision came in a case involving a golf-course developer in Jackson County, water quality certification and wetlands permit.
Record #:
34309
Author(s):
Abstract:
An apparent loophole in the North Carolina water quality standard for turbidity in surface waters allows exceedances of the numeric standard under certain conditions. Given that sediment is regarded by some to be the major surface water pollutant in North Carolina, the standards may need to be reconsidered.
Record #:
34324
Author(s):
Abstract:
On January 22, 2001, the United States Environmental Protection Agency finalized a rule reducing the drinking water standard for arsenic. However, on January 24, an executive memorandum was issued directing executive departments and agencies to hold up any proposed or newly promulgated rules until an appointee of the new administration could review them. While groups are challenging the new arsenic rule, North Carolina is moving forward with a proposal to change the state’s groundwater standard for arsenic in private drinking water wells.
Record #:
34325
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the early 1970s, the Chowan River Estuary and other waterbodies in North Carolina experienced algae blooms that interfered with industrial water supply, fishing and recreational use. Extensive research led the North Carolina Division of Water Quality to develop standards for chlorophyll-a, which is an indicator of algal biomass and water quality. This article discusses how these water quality standards were developed.
Record #:
34333
Author(s):
Abstract:
A pending change in Natural Resources Conservation Service standards for designing nutrient management plans for animal waste operations could force some animal producers in North Carolina to look for additional land on which to apply wastes. The unfavorable nitrogen-to-phosphorus ratio in manures has often resulted in an overapplication of phosphorus, which can further dissolve in soil water and seep into groundwater. North Carolina is identifying soil sites with high potential for phosphorus loss.
Record #:
34332
Author(s):
Abstract:
Effective water quality management is built on a foundation of water quality standards that are expressed in a manner that makes compliance assessment clear and unambiguous. Most surface water quality standards in North Carolina are based on a chemical criterion value and used to determine if a waterbody is compliant. This article gives an overview of the state’s standards and total maximum daily load (TMDL) program.
Record #:
34337
Author(s):
Abstract:
On December 11, 2001, the North Carolina Commission for Health Services approved a temporary rule reducing the Maximum Contaminant Level for arsenic in drinking water to the pending federal standard of ten parts-per-billion effective January 1, 2002. When the new rule goes into effect, public community and non-transient non-community drinking water systems that exceed the standard will be required to provide public notice of the exceedance.