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19 results for Sea Chest Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974
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Record #:
7556
Author(s):
Abstract:
The oldest grocery store on Hatteras Island was started in 1866 by C. B. Stowe and A. J. Stowe. The business has remained in the same family and has been in three or four buildings. An old ledger book describes how the business was run, costs of items and what people purchased, and debtor boat accounts, which were items purchased for use with boats.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p16-20, il
Record #:
7555
Abstract:
Before North Carolina began providing ferryboat service, residents of Hatteras Island depended on local ferryboat captains to transport them to the mainland or others islands of the Outer Banks. O'Neal and Tiedt discuss these early ferries and their captains, including Frazier Peele.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p6-12, il, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
7558
Abstract:
Burrus, who was born on Hatteras Island, was Dare County's first major league baseball player. The Philadelphia Athletics brought him up to the major leagues in 1919. In 1925, he was with the Boston Braves as their regular first baseman. He ended his career in 1930, with Atlanta. In ten years of professional baseball, Burrus had a batting average of .326 and a fielding average of .990. He returned to Hatteras Island where he was a Texaco distributor, fish buyer, and county commissioner. He died in Currituck County in 1972.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p25-27, por
Record #:
7557
Abstract:
In this SEA CHEST interview, Lloyd Styron discusses baseball on Hatteras Island. The first time he played the game was in 1914, and the first game he ever saw was between a team from Washington, North Carolina, and the Hatteras team. The visiting team came by boat. Baseball was played in the morning by boys aged 9-13; the 14-17- year-olds played until mid-afternoon; and the men played until dark. Styron recounts some of the games he played, other players, and players who went on to play major league baseball.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p21-24
Record #:
7559
Author(s):
Abstract:
Weather observations have been taken on Hatteras Island since 1874. Much of the information on this period is contained in the weather station's log books, which are housed at the Cape Hatteras Weather Service. The books contain material on weather, shipwrecks, and local happenings. The SEA CHEST staff continues the compilation of entries. This issue continues coverage of the year 1876.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p51-55
Record #:
35947
Author(s):
Abstract:
Outer Banks residents might be expected to harbor a yen for hobbies signifying fishing village lifeways. The author’s grandfather reflected the rule in model ship building and decoy carving. He could be seen as a model for his models, some featured in accompanying photos. His works gained recognition outside of the Banks by being published in National Geographic in the 1950s and featured in Ben Dixon MacNeill's The Hatterasman.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p28-29
Record #:
35949
Abstract:
“Atomic” alluded to his survival of the Baker day bomb set off on Bikini Island. Geiger was inspired by the discovery that he’d not been contaminated by radiation. As for sweet, that could refer to the disposition he displayed during his six month Marine stint and radiation- free status. More information about his military history could be viewed in the attached United Press article.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p41-47
Record #:
35946
Abstract:
Times had changed, as indicated in the girls’ age range, 18-28, and a marital status for some. A sign of changed times was also evident in chaperones needed if males visited. Timeless values could be seen in purposes for a club with an overnight stay option: rest, reading, and recreation.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p14-15
Record #:
35954
Author(s):
Abstract:
Remembrance of rescue from a Coast Guard boat overtaken by a hurricane was spurred by the death of Lt. Bernice Ramon Ballance. He, as much as the event, was a reminder that heroes, found during war and peace, can be located on a rescuing sea plane as much as capsized cutter. For more information about this event, refer to the book, North Carolina Hurricanes, by Charles B. Carney and Albert V. Hardy.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p59-64
Record #:
35952
Abstract:
Remnants of the ship, sunk between Hatteras Island and Ocracoke in 1913, were reputedly left along the coast. Pieces of the wreckage could also be perceived in its survivors and those left behind, like Mrs. Martha Barnett, to tell the tale.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p57
Record #:
35953
Author(s):
Abstract:
Accompaniment to the Martha Barnett Austin’s “Shipwreck! The George W. Wells” was this article, whose information about the sunken schooner was referenced from David Stick’s Graveyard of the Atlantic.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p58
Record #:
35951
Author(s):
Abstract:
Some terms part of the Outer Banks dialect, like shore and fatbacks, reflected the area's nautical nature. Other terms, like waist and fresh, more likely reflect the time period’s vernacular than place.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p56
Record #:
35948
Author(s):
Abstract:
Truth in the saying “a pictures is worth a thousand words” was evident by the photos included by the Sea Chest staff. In this case, the eight homes pictured speak of fishing village life decades distant, yet still standing.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p36-39
Record #:
35950
Author(s):
Abstract:
A healing or cure was as possible with these rural remedies, whether for toothache or animal bite, for ear infection or wasp sting.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p49-50
Record #:
35957
Author(s):
Abstract:
Remnants of a famous—and infamous—pirate’s legend were in a familial connection (one of Blackbeard’s wives, a native); his naming of Ocracoke; his death, when he reportedly sailed around the ship seven times after his beheading. Other remnants of the importance of ships were shipwrecks, such as the Carroll A. Derring. As for the origins for other town names, noted were Kill Devil Hills and Chicamacomico, both inspired by the original inhabitants.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p34-38