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211 results for "The Researcher"
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Record #:
34733
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fort Hancock was erected in 1778 to guard the entrance to Cape Lookout. A gift from the French Foreign Ministry, the fort and accompanying munitions and supplies were given to support Americans in their search for freedom. Several Comtes, Generals, and Admirals all served at the fort during the American Revolutionary War. The fort was dismantled in 1780.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 23 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2007-2008, p6-7, il, por
Record #:
34737
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mitchell Fulcher was a folk artist well known throughout Eastern North Carolina for his duck decoys. Born on the Core Sound into a small fishing community, Fulcher was employed in a wider range of cottage industries than solely decoy manufacture, including net making, hunting, trapping, and painting. His collection of tools used in net making and fishing is large; it includes many handmade gauges, wooden needles, cork floats, and terrapin gauges. As these goods were produced in industrial factories after 1910, today they are considered folk art collectibles.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 23 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2007-2008, p15-16, il, por
Record #:
34735
Author(s):
Abstract:
Loftin recalls visiting the Sea Breeze Theatre during his childhood in Beaufort. After receiving his weekly allowance of fifteen cents, Loftin would purchase enough penny candy to outlast an afternoon at the movies. Meeting up with friends, the children would enter the theatre for a dime. The movies showed in order—first a cartoon, followed by the latest installment in a serial. Then, finally, the feature presentation—cowboy films were favorites of the author.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 23 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2007-2008, p12-13, il
Record #:
34736
Author(s):
Abstract:
Madie Bell was a Harlowe, North Carolina native and attended Greensboro Female College where she studied teaching. Bell worked as an educator in Morehead City at the turn of the 20th century. An active member of the Daughters of the American Revolution and the Daughters of the Confederacy, Bell organized the Morehead City Woman’s Club, serving as its first president in 1921. She continued a life of civic service, sitting on the Board of Trustees for Morehead City schools.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 23 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2007-2008, p14-15, il, por
Record #:
34729
Author(s):
Abstract:
In July, 1917, construction was completed on the breakwater at Cape Lookout. Measuring over two miles in length, the breakwater was built to create safe anchorage for vessels. The breakwater itself is approximately 50 feet in height and constructed from North Carolina granite. Nearby facilities include a Coast Guard Station. While the breakwater was being built, there were numerous other additions to local infrastructure including a new school house, an increase in farms and farm acreage, and creation of new Menhaden fish factories.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 23 Issue 1, Spring-Summer 2007, p14-15, il, por
Record #:
34730
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Outer Banks north of Cape Lookout boast the highest number of Coast Guard Stations—25 in total. The most dangerous stretches of coast are guarded by the Cape Lookout and Portsmouth stations. The town of Portsmouth is nestled at the northern end of Portsmouth island across the inlet from Ocracoke. Inhabited by 150 people during the early 20th century, the town contains a Coast Guard station, Methodist church, and village store. Residents keep sheep and chickens while wild ponies roam the island. Some of these are trained by Coast Guardsmen, who use them to patrol the beach during nightly watches.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 23 Issue 1, Spring-Summer 2007, p16-18, il, map
Record #:
34727
Abstract:
Captain Levi Tolson Oglesby, a Carteret County native, served as the county legislator for the state between 1854 and 1856. During his tenure, the government worked to establish free education for freed people in the state and suffrage for non-property owners. Oglesby supported both these endeavors, and championed increased infrastructure such as a rail line connecting Beaufort Harbor to the rest of the county. During the Civil War, Oglesby served as captain of the Carteret County militia.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 23 Issue 1, Spring-Summer 2007, p3-9, il, por
Record #:
34728
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article addresses the practice of hog killing as remembered by the author. An annual event that happened between Thanksgiving and early January, community members would gather to butcher and process hogs raised on local farms. The author discusses butchery practices and some of the recipes used by their family. Many of the cuts of meat required additional preservation including salting, drying, smoking, or canning.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 23 Issue 1, Spring-Summer 2007, p11-13, il
Record #:
34731
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author shares memories of growing up in Beaufort between 1921 and 1931. Born into a family with three siblings, the author recalls various establishments including the Courthouse, Methodist Church, family doctor, and railroad. The menhaden fisheries, too, left a lasting impression for the smell that would waft through town as fish were being processed.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 23 Issue 1, Spring-Summer 2007, p19-21, il, por
Record #:
7912
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many people have heard of Fairleigh Dickinson University, and the third-largest medical products and equipment industry in the world, Becton-Dickinson. Fewer people know that Fairleigh Dickinson was born in Carteret County in the Core Creek community. He left home at fourteen to take a job on a sailing ship. Later a chance meeting with Maxwell Becton of Kinston led to the founding of Becton-Dickinson, which reported revenues of almost $5 million in 2004. Although he led a very busy life filled with national and international commitments, Dickinson and his family returned to Core Creek every year till his death in 1948.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 22 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 2006, p16-18, il, por, bibl
Record #:
7913
Author(s):
Abstract:
A severe hurricane struck Carteret County with wind gusts in excess of 150 miles per hour on August 18, 1879. William B. Duncan wrote several letters to his son Thomas Isaac Duncan about the effects of the storm. The letters provide an eyewitness account of the storm's damage.
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Record #:
34742
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1914, Orion Knitting Mills moved their operations from Kinston to Beaufort, North Carolina. To entice the company into moving, Beaufort citizens purchased a lot and erected a building for company use. Local businessmen further influenced the town to exempt the mill for taxes and electrical payments for the first five years of operation. In July, 1914 the company agreed and erected a factory and worker housing on ‘Knit Mill Hill’ near Shell Road, Beaufort. Local women were employed as workers in the mill; they operated machines which manufactured hosiery and knit goods. The Orion Knitting Mill closed in 1931, and was replaced by a tomato packing plant. In 1934, it again transitioned into Saunders Dry Cleaners.
Source:
Record #:
34743
Author(s):
Abstract:
The breakwater at Cape Lookout was first constructed in 1915 as a means of improving harbor safety. Constructed from North Carolina quarried granite, the stone was brought by train from Raleigh to Morehead City. From there, it was transported eleven miles to the dumping point on scows and derric boats in 1,000 ton loads. The breakwater measured approximately 100 feet in length and cost 3.5 million dollars to build. Construction took 18 months and involved over 30 vessels carrying materials to site.
Source:
Record #:
34749
Author(s):
Abstract:
Beaufort’s first African-American school, the Washburn seminary, was founded in 1867 by the American Missionary Association and the northern Congregation Church. Located in a traditionally black neighborhood, the school’s aim was to train and educate freed slaves living in a refugee camp in Beaufort. Teachers were brought from northern states as educators, and by 1900 the school had expanded to include several new buildings including a training workshop and classrooms. In 1920, the main school building burned and was rebuilt near the new Beaufort High School which catered to the black community. Today, this building remains in use as the Beaufort Central School.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2006, p5-6
Record #:
34752
Author(s):
Abstract:
Written in 1921, this article describes Cape Lookout at the “lonesomest” place in the world. Prior to the First World War, Cape Lookout was a bustling harbor undergoing improvements. With the war effort, however, construction of a breakwater stopped and many residents returned to Harker’s Island on the Core sound. Returning to the community, the author notes that many of the fishermen have abandoned the Cape Lookout fish stock because of its poor value. As one of the most dangerous shoals, the Cape Lookout Coast Guard station is outfitted with radio service. The guardsmen had rescued 30 vessels between 1911 and 1921.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2006, p9-10, il