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5 results for Beaufort--Social life and customs--20th Century
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Record #:
8503
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author recalls her youth and summers spent at her grandmother's home near Beaufort.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 3, Aug 1983, p12
Full Text:
Record #:
34734
Author(s):
Abstract:
Davis, North Carolina, was home to the first movie theater in Carteret County. Beaufort soon followed the trend and in 1911 opened the Sea Breeze Theatre. A family business, the Sea Breeze was operated by William Luther Paul and his children. Projected by hand, films were shown at the theatre once per week. As they were silent, subtitles were included. To aid in the movie going experience, Paul designed a number of sound effects which could be operated in the projection booth including train whistles, horses running, and horns playing. When sound was finally incorporated into movies, a Victrola would play the associated record as the movie ran. By 1916, movies had expanded to include serial films with episodes playing over a number of weeks. Paul continued to experiment with sound and by 1928 had a working model of a Vitaphone system. The theatre operated through World War II.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 23 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2007-2008, p8-11, il
Record #:
34731
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author shares memories of growing up in Beaufort between 1921 and 1931. Born into a family with three siblings, the author recalls various establishments including the Courthouse, Methodist Church, family doctor, and railroad. The menhaden fisheries, too, left a lasting impression for the smell that would waft through town as fish were being processed.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 23 Issue 1, Spring-Summer 2007, p19-21, il, por
Record #:
34735
Author(s):
Abstract:
Loftin recalls visiting the Sea Breeze Theatre during his childhood in Beaufort. After receiving his weekly allowance of fifteen cents, Loftin would purchase enough penny candy to outlast an afternoon at the movies. Meeting up with friends, the children would enter the theatre for a dime. The movies showed in order—first a cartoon, followed by the latest installment in a serial. Then, finally, the feature presentation—cowboy films were favorites of the author.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 23 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2007-2008, p12-13, il
Record #:
34749
Author(s):
Abstract:
Beaufort’s first African-American school, the Washburn seminary, was founded in 1867 by the American Missionary Association and the northern Congregation Church. Located in a traditionally black neighborhood, the school’s aim was to train and educate freed slaves living in a refugee camp in Beaufort. Teachers were brought from northern states as educators, and by 1900 the school had expanded to include several new buildings including a training workshop and classrooms. In 1920, the main school building burned and was rebuilt near the new Beaufort High School which catered to the black community. Today, this building remains in use as the Beaufort Central School.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2006, p5-6