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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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39 results for "Community colleges"
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Record #:
29746
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In small Western North Carolina towns, some lesser-known yet high-ranking community colleges are changing lives for local students of all ages and backgrounds. Mayland Community College provides hundreds of workforce development and continuing education courses that serve Mitchell, Avery and Yancey counties. Western Piedmont Community College in Morganton is one of the only community colleges in the state with a sustainable agriculture program.
Record #:
36243
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Proving the persistent presence of the manufacturing industry in the state’s economic development are eight experts. Questions related to manufacturing covered these topics: its current state, how it has changed, how it recruits and develops workers, what can help sustain it, how can federal initiatives help it, and how it will change over the next two decades. Their responses collectively indicate the important role community colleges play in its development, changes in business ethics, and need for ongoing technological advancements.
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Record #:
36247
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Attesting to the potential and positive impact of North Carolina’s 58 community colleges were profiles of Asheville-Buncombe, Edgecombe, Fayetteville Technical, Guilford Technical, Lenoir, Pitt Community, and Vance-Granville. Asserting to their potential and positive impact in North Carolina were statistics for: average median wage, number of companies receiving customized job training, and numbers of military members who will advance their education, post service.
Record #:
30919
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The NC Community College System prepares students for a variety of careers, while giving members of the workforce opportunities to enhance their skill sets.
Record #:
36275
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On the downside to the takeover of AI in employment sectors: the elimination of jobs traditionally targeted for elimination, such as factory work; the elimination of highly paid positions such as software designing. Changes that may be a mixed blessing include a minimum guaranteed income provided by the government. However, what may be criticized now as a sign of a socialistic society may one day be regarded as the basis of economic survival.
Record #:
36285
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North Carolina’s contribution to industries such as biotechnology and its quality of life may define it as a wonderful place to live and work. Supporting this belief were six experts, offering insights about its place in the biotech global market, the importance of industry in the state, appeals the area has to international biotech companies, the importance of workforce training to international biotech companies, and what will keep such companies in North Carolina.
Record #:
36284
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Community colleges, traditionally considered a second rate form of higher education, is increasingly making a first grade contribution to the state’s economy and work force. North Carolina’s fifty-eight community colleges are proving themselves an asset for fields such as biotechnology, welding, law enforcement, aviation, and manufacturing.
Record #:
36299
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A positive economic and occupational impact in North Carolina is possible through its growth in industries such as alternate energy. Such an impact is also perceived worldwide. Attesting to this domestic and international impact is insights from eight of the industry’s experts.
Record #:
24828
Abstract:
North Carolina businesses are now teaming with the state’s Community College System to train skilled workers in the fields they need. Catawba Valley Community College in Hickory, for example, teaches students upholstery, pattern-making, and assembly skills to train for the furniture industry in Catawba County. Other community colleges are tailoring their programs for their respective county’s industries.
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Record #:
29777
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Running a small business is difficult, but the North Carolina Small Business Center Networks provides every tool possible to make the task a little easier. Operating out of all the state's 58 community colleges, the network provides workshops and guidance to help the small business sector grow throughout North Carolina.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 67 Issue 1, Jan 2009, p24-25, por
Record #:
29780
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In both Edgecombe and Nash counties, community colleges are striving to provide services not only to students but the community as well. Programs, initiatives, and specialties make Edgecombe Community College and Nash Community College integral in their community development infrastructures.
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NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 67 Issue 1, Jan 2009, p37-40, por
Record #:
18740
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The state's community college system was developed in the 1960s by W. Dallas Herring, former Chairman of the State Board of Education. By 2008, changing economic dynamics prompted a reevaluation of the system and how to meet the state's educational, and ultimately employment, needs. The author assesses what he determined to be four critical areas of concern faced by community colleges (\"nontraditional\" students, completion rates, work force shortage, and lack of infrastructure for students) and how to overcome these issues to create a more productive system and better educated and qualified workforce for the state.
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Record #:
18760
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Historically, the community college system developed to provide the state with a qualified work-force to fill manufacturing jobs beginning with Buncombe County Junior College in 1928. Having been organized into a state-wide system in 1963 under the Community College Act, this network of institutions faced contemporary problems of changing economic demands throughout the early 2000s. The author presents the history of the community college system to try and anticipate how this institution will need to adapt to future developments within the state's evolving economy.
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Record #:
18762
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The article reviews the diverse student population served by community colleges with a statistical breakdown of enrolled students by age, race, part-time or full-time. Compared with the University of North Carolina system, community college students can be qualified as 'non-traditional' and working students. Trends within the enrollments in the community college system reflect diversifying demographics for the entire state.
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Record #:
29758
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As Guilford County's aviation cluster grows, Guilford Technical Community College is taking on the growth with T.H. Davis Aviation Center. The institution is training future workers to support the growing aviation sector and support developments at Piedmont Triad International Airport.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 3, Mar 2008, p50, 52, por