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9 results for Electric Vehicles
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Record #:
27964
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The Triangle area is working hard to contribute to a future gasoline-free future. The advances in electric car and battery technology are explored in-depth. Research on the technologies is taking place at North Carolina State University’s FREEDOM Systems Center and the College of Engineering and at Raleigh’s Advanced Vehicle Research Center. Duke Energy and Progress Energy are local utility companies who are committing to leading the way by reducing their use of coal and nuclear power in favor of renewable energy.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 27, July 2010, p15-18 Periodical Website
Record #:
29913
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Electric cars have become more attractive to consumers as environmental stewardship has become increasingly relevant. In the Asheville metropolitan area, there are more than sixty public charging stations for electric cars, some of them solar-powered. The use of electric cars has been promoted as part of efforts to reduce air pollution.
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Record #:
30686
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Electric vehicles have come a long way since they were first developed in the nineteenth century and reintroduced in 2010. As the number of electric vehicles continues to increase in North Carolina, cities throughout the state are installing charging stations. The use of electric vehicles helps to improve the environment, and has also led to growth in local jobs and the economy.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 46 Issue 11, Nov 2014, p22-23, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
30867
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In recent years, the need for energy storage has grown and sparked new efforts to find the better battery. The North Carolina Association of Electric Cooperatives and Four County Electric Membership Corporation are road testing plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). These cars use larger, more powerful lithium-ion batteries that can be charged overnight from a standard outlet.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 41 Issue 11, Nov 2009, p12-13, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
31058
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Students in Broderick Ward’s Electric Trade II class at Southeast Halifax High School in Halifax, North Carolina recently converted a 1989 Geo Metro into an electric car, and won a national racing competition with it. That Metro and the students from a poor and rural county are what inspired a novel that is the basis for a new Hollywood film.
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Record #:
31071
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North Carolina is one of eleven states that will be getting a higher grade for investing in energy-efficiency this school year. Through its Plug-In Hybrid Electric School Bus Project, Advanced Energy, a Raleigh-based nonprofit corporation, arranged with IC Corporation, the nation’s largest school bus manufacturer, to provide hybrid school buses to the Wake County and Mecklenburg County school districts.
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Record #:
31616
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Howard H. Arnold and A.N. (Drew) Wiegner of Forsyth County built their own electric cars in January, 1974, during the height of the gasoline shortage. Arnold and Wiegner are engineers at Western Electric in Winston-Salem, and built their cars to run on batteries instead of fuel. The electric cars move at three miles per kilowatt hour.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, Apr 1976, p8-9, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
36271
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Evident is the promotion of alternative fuel sources and eco-friendly living in the provision of Electric Vehicles (EV) and charging stations. The current availability of both in North Carolina placed the state at number twelve in the nation. The author noted the relative scarcity was felt more in Western North Carolina. She, however, was optimistic about greater receptivity and rise in rank on the horizon for this type of transportation.
Record #:
36299
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A positive economic and occupational impact in North Carolina is possible through its growth in industries such as alternate energy. Such an impact is also perceived worldwide. Attesting to this domestic and international impact is insights from eight of the industry’s experts.